The Stations

Verdun

Overview

Verdun is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of the Verdun borough, which itself was named in honour of Saverdun, a commune in France, from where Verdun's founder Zacharie Dupuy was originally from.

The station has two entrances, 4525 Verdun and 4520 Verdun. Both entrances are in a black tone and have lots of tinted windows similarly as neighbouring station Jolicoeur.

Once you go in, you will take two sets of stairs or escalators to reach the ticket barriers. While on the first stairs, you will get to see grey walls with purple and orange motif lines which look nice. The second ones have yellow barriers at the right which also look nice and match the bars that hold the lights suspended from the walls. At the bottom of those stairs, you reach the concourse where the walls are a lighter grey and the same style of lines than upstairs are recreated but this time in purple and gold. Looks good again. You then have the ticket barriers and when you pass through, you reach what could be qualified as a balcony as it gives access directly to the track and platforms, which is ideal for train spotting. Stairs will lead you to both platforms who have the same matching lines than in most of the station, again purple and gold. The floors are made of white tiles.


Unique Features

The station has forced perspective over the platforms and tracks as the ceiling is lower on the Western side of the station.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Jolicoeur
  • Following Station: de L'Église
  • Entrances: 2

Public Artwork

Antoine Lamarche created 'Bas-reliefs', which are lines on the upper part of the concrete walls of the station. Since the lines are in all kinds of directions, it creates an original pattern, on which is added the yellow bars which hold the lights, creating a nice overall result.

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Jolicoeur

Overview

Jolicoeur is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Jolicoeur street, which takes its name from priest Jean-Moise Jolicoeur.

It has only one entrance, at 6200 Drake, and it is beautiful. It takes the shape of a large hall the size of a two storey building, with tinted windows all over. The mezzanine is very large and very practical. There are doors on both sides of the entrance and passengers who enter will quickly find their way as on one side is the convenience store and on the other the turnstiles, which quickly lead to the stairs that lead to the platforms. Like Angrignon, this station is not that deep so no escalators are needed. And, also like Angrignon, this station is receiving natural light on the platform from the mezzanine windows.

The platforms are very nice, with walls covered from grey bricks which, originally, are vertically installed. The black name bars are installed on red placeholders that add just the perfect element of color. The floor has some orange triangles pointing to the track inside black circles, even though, contrary to what may be expected, they do not point at where doors open. The benches are red, similar to those at Radisson, and the ends of the platforms on both sides of the tunnels are painted in orange. Another thing that is interesting in this station is if you look on the tunnel in the Angrignon direction, you will see a big curve and it's interesting seeing trains arrive and leave through it.


Unique Features

This is one of the best stations to watch trains from the mezzanine as they pass right under the floor, and with the windows all over it, it's one of the most scenic places for trainwatchers.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Monk
  • Following Station: Verdun
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

The 42 orange triangles on the floor, made by Claude Boucher (who also worked on Honoré Beaugrand station), gives this station's platform one of the best floors of the network.


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Monk

Overview

Monk is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Monk Boulevard, which was named in honour of lawyer Frederick Monk.

It has two entrances, 6805 Monk and 6750 Monk. Both are similar, in beautiful dark brown bricks. The entrances are relatively small compared to other stations of the network, but once you enter, you can quickly see how vast the station is, and also that the beautiful brown is a theme of the station. The view from the escalators is beautiful and it gives another chance to see how vast and majestic this station is. The walls at the bottom are, contrary to the rest of the station, grey. At the left of the escalators is the convenience store.

The platforms are completely brown from the walls to the floors. The colours are beautiful yet somehow when you look closely the walls show their age.


Unique Features

The bricks on the entrances integrate the Metro's logo. Also, the volume of the mezzanine is the equivalent of four levels.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Angrignon
  • Following Station: Jolicoeur
  • Entrances: 2

Public Artwork

Germain Bergeron did sculptures in painted steel called "Pic et Pelle", which is located on the overpass. It is an honour to the workers who built the metro.


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Angrignon

Overview

Angrignon is the western terminus of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of the nearby Angrignon Boulevard, which itself was named in honour of former member of Montreal city councillor Jean-Baptists-Arthur Angrignon.

It has only one entrance, on 3500 des Trinitaires Boulevard, and it is grandiose. The top of the station is covered with many domes that consist of windows being held by beautiful red frames to create a beautiful result. The fact that this theme also applies to the bus station that is attached to the station just makes it more spectacular.

When you enter the mezzanine, it has the same level of awesomeness due to the fact that the ceilings all consist of those domes in glass windows, which brings light in, between those red frames. It is also very large, which is always useful for terminal stations, especially those who have bus terminals associated with them.

The platforms are also all illuminated from natural light as they are at ground level and the entirety of the walls are made of windows, with the top row using similar round shapes as the domes above. Again, the red frames are the only other material vertically, with the horizontal frames being covered with the black name bars that can be seen in all stations. The platforms are wider around the center where the stairs are located and narrower on the ends. Note that since it is not that deep, no escalators are installed in this station.


Unique Features

The natural light that is on the station and platforms. Also, at 4,3 metres underground, it is tied with Longueil-Université-de-Sherbrooke as the station which is the closest to the surface.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Following Station: Monk
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

Sometimes, the lack of art isn't even noticed when the architecture is so spectacular. Jean-Louis Beaulieu, who is the architect for this station (in addition to another beautiful one, Snowdon) definitely deserves the credit to have made a masterpiece, even if it is not officially considered a piece of art.


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Charlevoix

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Cadillac

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Viau

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Saint-Laurent

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Radisson

Overview

Radisson is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Radisson street, which was named for explorer Pierre-Esprit Radisson.

The station has two entrances: The northern entrance at 7155 Sherbrooke East and the southern entrance at 7250 Sherbrooke East. The entrance buildings are relatively small and the majority of their surface is covered with windows. The space in which they are is relatively quiet as opposed to other subway entrances, especially the one with the bus stop. Once you enter the northern entrance, it has some stairs that lead to a corridor that will bring you to the concourse, which is just next to the southern entry. A convenience store is situated just before the turnstiles. Once you pass the turnstiles you go through escalators that will bring you to the overpass, and as you go near the bottom of the stairs you can have one of the best views of the tracks that are just in the centre.

The view from the side platforms is magnificent. The benches are red, and if you look up you can see the escalators and the lights, which are suspended from the ceiling in black lamp shades.

The points of interest are Place Versailles mall as well as Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal. Also, the 44 bus will quickly lead you to another mall, Les Galeries d'Anjou.


Unique Features

The view from the overpass is definitely special.

The station was featured (along Lionel-Groulx) in the movie "The Jackal", where the station was arranged to pass for the Capitol Heights station in Washington, D.C., despite the fact that any metrophile would easily recognize that those stations are not similar at all, mainly because Capitol Heights has an island platform, yet the colors and architecture of both stations are still two worlds apart.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Langelier
  • Following Station: Honoré-Beaugrand
  • Entrances: 3

Public Artwork

It is ironic that one of the most beautiful stations of the network doesn't have a dedicated specific work of art, yet the architecture of the station, made by Papineau, Gérin-Lajoie, Le Blanc and Edwards, is a work of art in itself.

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Pie-IX

Overview

Pie-IX is a station of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Pie-IX Boulevard, which got its name from Pope Pie-IX.

The station has two entrances: The western entrance is at 2700 Pie-IX and the eastern entrance is at 2705 Pie-IX. The eastern one is very original as its shape is more circular than square, which can make a parallel with the Olympic Stadium to which the station is attached. As soon as you enter, you can still feel the circular shape, from the ceiling with all its lights installed on a circular pattern through the stairs who are outlined by a circular wall. As for the western entrance, it has the form of a square, but it leads to the stadium through a corridor with a more curvy shape.

The concourse is one of the bigger in all the network, in order to accommodate the large crowds of Olympic Stadium, which hosted the 1976 Olympics as well as the Montreal Expos. It is all in shades of brown and the floor has circular shapes. Even its bricks are made in circular shapes. There are many turnstiles, again to accommodate large crowds.

There are two side platforms, again in shades of browns. On the wall of the Angrignon platform, you can see the five Olympic rings that were sculpted in bronze. There also used to be logos of the Expos when they were in existence. Some sections of the platforms are covered with bricks, again in a tone of brown. There are also large grills that can be locked, and they are opened when there are events at the stadium so people can go from the metro to the stadium directly.

Apart from the stadium, the points of interest around the station are Saputo Stadium, which is used for soccer, the Montreal Botanical Garden, the Montreal Biodome, the RIO, which manages the Olympic installations, and finally, Collège de Maisonneuve, which has 7000 pre-university students.


Unique Features

There are a few unique features, from the circular shapes at different places to the vast mezzanine.

Also, it is the only station who has extra tracks just before it in order to park trains who can leave quickly when events end. This is a concept similar to the Mets-Willets Point station in New York. As soon as the Expos' game would end, trains could depart the station heading for downtown.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Joliette
  • Following Station: Viau
  • Entrances: 2

Public Artwork

Jordi Bonet did a large mural in the mezzanine. It is called Citius, Altius, Fortius, and made in concrete and aluminium. Marcel Raby also did a decorative grill on the wall of the Angrignon platform, around the stairs.


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Peel

Overview

Peel is a station of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

Its name comes from Peel Street, which was named in honour of Sir Robert Peel, who was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

The station has two side platforms.The main color of this station is white, and the theme of the station is circles. There are many on the walls all over the stations. With many of these circles being bright colors on a white backdrop, this gives the station plenty of light and makes it animated no matter the time of day. The walkway over the track is very low and you can feel the wind made by the trains much more when you walk there than in other stations.

This station sees many passengers use it on a daily basis due to its downtown location and proximity to many shopping malls including Les Cours Mont-Royal, as well as Ogilvy's and Holt & Renfrew stores, as well as Sainte-Catherine and Crescent streets.

There are four official entrances to this station: Peel West (1115 de Maisonneuve), Peel East (1011 de Maisonneuve), Metcalfe Street (1008 de Maisonneuve) and Stanley Street (1465 Stanley).However, it is part of Montreal Underground so it is easy to enter it from a few points of access underground.


Unique Features

As well as being part of Montreal Underground, this station is special because it is the shortest distance between two stations (with McGill). The proximity is so close that when a train stops at McGill, you can hear it from Peel.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Guy-Concordia
  • Following Station: McGill
  • Entrances: 4

Public Artwork

Jean-Paul Mousseau did 54 large circles made by Jean-Paul Mousseau throughout the station.Today, 37 remains.They are integrated everywhere, with bright circles next to advertising panels, as well as ceramic circles in one entrance, as well as circular tiles on the floor and walls.Mousseau also did work at 3 other stations: Viau, Honoré-Beaugrand and Square-Victoria-OACI.


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Préfontaine

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Place-des-Arts

Overview

Place-des-Arts is a station of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honor of Place des Arts, the famous performing centre hosting a variety of cultural events including theatre and music, which is also attached to the station.

The station has two side platforms, and is beautiful with brick walls in zig zag forms which are in different shades of grey (including blueish grey) mixed with floors whose colors alternate between light grey and green.Since it is made by the same architects as Atwater (David, Boulva, Clève), it brings the same impression of proximity.

In addition to its namesake, this station is also at proximity to Complexe Desjardins, which includes a shopping mall, a hotel and offices, as well as Edifice Jean-Lesage, which is the headquarter of Hydro-Québec.

There are four official entrances to the station: 1555 Jeanne-Mance, 2020 de Bleury, 1990 de Bleury, and 150 Ontario.


Unique Features

Its zig zag walls are quite unique.

In addition, along with a few stations of the Green Line including McGill and Beaudry, this station appears in the movie "C't'a ton tour, Laura Cadieux."

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: McGill
  • Following Station: Saint-Laurent
  • Entrances: 4

Public Artwork

This station is home to the first piece of art of the Montreal Metro, which is a painted glass mural by Frederick Back which is called 'Les arts lyriques'.It refers to Montreal musical history and events. There is also a mosaika made by Saskia Siebrand over the Angrignon tunnel.


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Papineau

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McGill

Overview

McGill is a station of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro, and the most frequented of all stations on the network.

It was named in honor of McGill University, which got its name from its founder, James McGill.

The station has two side platforms.And while most stations of the network are easily recognizable over the years, this one has changed colors many times over the years.Its original colors were orange pillars with yellow on the walls.In the 90s, the pillars were changed to green and the station also had shades of burgundy.But then an advertiser which had orange as a primary color of its brand took the majority of the advertisement in the station and had the pillars change back to orange.After this sponsorship ended, the pillars were changed to white as part of another company's advertising campaign.Today, the pillars are in red, which is the color of McGill University.

The station is the busiest of the network due to its downtown location and direct access to many shopping landmarks including Eaton Centre, The Bay and Place Ville-Marie.It also gives access to Montreal Underground.McGill University's 40,000 students also add to the many passengers of the station.Other places of interest in the areas are Musée Grévin and Royal Victoria Hospital.

There are several stores inside the station, including coffee shops Tim Hortons and Second Cup as well as gift shop Carlton Cards and Scotiabank, in addition to 2 pizza shops.

There are six official entrances to the station: 690 de Maisonneuve West, 640 de Maisonneuve West, 811 de Maisonneuve West, 2055 University, 2021 Union, and 1445 Union.Many people will also enter through Montreal Underground.


Unique Features

As well as being part of Montreal Underground, this station used to have a library until 1996.

This station was also featured (along with Beaudry) in "C't'à ton tour, Laura Cadieux", a 1997 Quebec movie.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Peel
  • Following Station: Place-des-Arts
  • Entrances: 6

Public Artwork

In addition to the pillars, there are 5 stained-glass murals made by Nicolas Sollogoub, that were donated by Macdonald Tobacco.


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Lionel-Groulx

Overview

Lionel-Groulx is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Green and Orange lines.

This station was initially going to be called Albert but following the death of Lionel Groulx, who was a Roman Catholic priest, his name was given to the station before it opened.In recent years, there has been demands to change the Lionel-Groulx name because of antisemitism comments he made.Jazz pianist Oscar Peterson has been suggested as a possible replacement because he grew up in this area.

Like most transfer stations, it has two level of platforms, however what is great with Lionel-Groulx is the way it is made, you can see all four trains at the same time from the top level as if you look around the escalators, you can see the lower platform and since the lower level trains are closer to the centre as the upper level trains (the upper level platform goes over the lower level trains), they are easy to see.Also, if you stand at the right side of the platform on the upper level, you can see trains move up the hill as they arrive, which is the only station where you can see the tires of the train you are going to board as it arrives.You can also see the train at the lower level leave by being at the same spot.

It is one of the stations where the architecture is most worth seeing.With its orange floors as well as granite walls and ceiling, it is truly a classic.It gives you an impression you are not in a subway station but in a large complex where the subway just happens to enter.

The main destination around the station is the Atwater Market.

There is only one entrance, 620 Atwater Street.

The station has two central platforms, although technically each line has stacked platforms as it is made to facilitate transfers, so that passengers can switch lines without taking the stairs.Passengers going downtown can switch on the lower platform and those going to the Western parts of the lines can switch on the upper platform.Transfers between Green and Orange lines (even through the stairs) are also quicker to do here than at Berri-UQAM due to the station layout, and some passengers can actually save time by going an extra station to do their transfer here (For example, someone from the northeast part of the Orange line going to Atwater will get there quicker switching at Lionel-Groulx than Berri).Lionel-Groulx is also better arranged than Snowdon for the moment as the majority of passengers transferring at Snowdon need to take the stairs, as Snowdon was built assuming that line 5 would be expanded to the West, which never happened.

Lionel-Groulx was built as a transfer station from the start, yet it opened on the Green line first, on September 3 1978, as opposed to April 28 1980 for Orange line.

There is a Couche-Tard convenience store and a Cafe Depot coffee shop, and a souvenir shop selling various accessories on the upper platform, as well as a Van Houte coffee shop anda Tabatout convenience store on the lower one.


Unique Features

This is one of only 5 stations to have a different layout than side platforms.Also, the trains on the lower platform open their doors on the left.

The station was featured (along Radisson) in the movie "The Jackal", where Lionel-Groulx was arranged to pass for the Metro Center station in Washington, D.C.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978 (Line 1) & April 28, 1980 (Line 2)
  • Line: 1 & 2
  • Previous Station: Charlevoix (Line 1) & Place-Saint-Henri (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Atwater (Line 1) & Georges-Vanier (Line 2)
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

The artwork of the station is a wood sculpture called "The Tree of Life", by Italian sculptor Joseph Rifesser.It is on the mezzanine level and represents 5 different faces from the 5 continents, and also a pair of stainless steel mural sculptures by station architect Yves Roy, also on the mezzanine level, which can also be seen on the higher platform.


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LaSalle

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Langelier

Overview

Langelier is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honor of Langelier Boulevard, which was named in honor of politician Sir François Langelier.

The station has three entrances: 6595 Sherbrooke East, 6610 Sherbrooke East and 3355 Langelier. The three entrances, which are at 3 corners of an intersection, share a beautiful sobre square design in tones of granite. Only the lights and metro logo are added to the exterior.

The mezzanine is in the form of an arch, which reminds us of most Washington, D.C. metro stations. When you add the lights on the ceiling, it adds an element of design unique to this station. It is situated at a level relatively close to the tracks so you quickly feel the ambiance of the subway.

The stairs leading to the side platforms are beautifully designed, and a stainless steel ramp, visible from the platform, matches the stainless steel that is present all around the platforms, most notably the circular cut-outs sculptural grilles made by Charles Daudelin.

There are few points of interest around the station. The mall Centre Domaine may be the most famous place near it.


Unique Features

The grilles of Daudelin are quite unique. Also, the lights above the entrance's doors are between two squares with holes in front of circles that are a unique design element.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Cadillac
  • Following Station: Radisson
  • Entrances: 3

Public Artwork

As with so many things as far as this station is concerned, it all goes back to the stainless steel grilles of Charles Daudelin, which are classic yet original with each one having a different color inside the opening.

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Joliette

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Honoré-Beaugrand

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Guy-Concordia

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Frontenac

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De l'Église

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Assomption

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Atwater

Overview

Atwater is a station of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro, and its original Western terminus station from its opening in 1966 until the extension to Angrignon in 1978. Its name comes from Atwater Avenue, which was named in honour of Montreal municipal politician Edwin Atwater.

The station has two side platforms. The main colours of the station are beige, light grey, and brown. The walls are made of bricks alternating between those colours. The ceiling is relatively low and gives an impression of proximity.

Until 1996, this station was very popular as it was the one that hockey fans took to go see the Montreal Canadiens games at the Forum. Additional landmarks around the station include Place Alexis Nihon and Dawson College.
There are two entrances to the station, 3015 Maisonneuve West and 2322 Sainte-Catherine. You can also enter through Place Alexis Nihon and Westmount Square.

Unique Features

As well as having been an original terminus station, it also had the distinction of being one of the only 2 original stations (along with Longueuil) who were outside the city of Montreal as it is located in Westmount. Also, fare control zones are practically just over the rail tracks as opposed to most stations which have theirs way higher.

Station Map


Places of Interest


Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Lionel-Groulx
  • Following Station: Guy-Concordia
  • Entrances: 2

Public Artwork

There isn't a specific artwork at this station but the brick on the walls as well as the orifinal wood staircase are pieces of art in themselves.


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Beaudry

Overview

Beaudry is a station of the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named for Beaudry street, which was named for Pierre Beaudry, who owned the land across which the street was opened. Over the last 20 years, there have been people in the LGBTQ community who have expressed their wish to change the name to Beaudry-Le Village because of the importance the Village has gained in Montreal.

The station, which is in the heart of Montreal's Gay Village, has integrated the colours of the rainbow by having a pillar in each of those colours above the only entrance, 1255 Sainte-Catherine East, which has similar windows as Berri-UQAM's main entrance. Since many of the businesses around it also have either the flag or the colours somewhere in their facade, the station fits right in with them.

As opposed to its neighbour station Berri, this one is one of the smallest as far as the overall volume is concerned. The side platforms are not deep and the ceiling is low, with the overpass being quite low, similar to Atwater. The walls are mostly beige and light brown. The station has only one ticket hall with four turnstiles next to it.

The points of interest around the station are mostly related to the Gay Village. There is Cabaret Mado, where world-famous drag queen Mado Lamotte performs, Club Unity, Campus club that serves mainly the gay community (but welcomes everyone), as well as many convenience stores, restaurants, barber shops and other businesses that aim at the general public. It is also the station to use to go to Montreal's two biggest tv studios, Radio-Canada and TVA.


Unique Features

Without a doubt, this has to go to the moving sidewalk, which brings people from the mezzanine to the overpass, and is unique in the network. It was integrated in the movie "C'ta ton tour, Laura Cadieux" where the star character of the movie, played by Ginette Reno, is afraid to go on it. They were chosen as the slope was too light to use regular escalators.

Also, from May to September, Sainte-Catherine street, on which the station is located, becomes close to traffic as part of Aires Libres so pedestrians can walk all over the street in this area, making this the only station that is located on a street with no traffic.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: December 21, 1966 (still considered part of the original network)
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Berri-UQAM
  • Following Station: Papineau
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

The rainbow pillars above the entrance doors are beautiful. They were made by Jacques Thibault.

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Berri-UQAM

Overview

Berri-UQAM is the main transfer station of the Montreal Metro, serving all three of the original lines (Green, Orange, Yellow).

The station was originally called Berri-de-Montigny as it was at the corner of Berri and de Montigny streets. However, since the name of de Montigny street changed to de Maisonneuve soon after the opening, the station was going to change its name to Berri-de-Maisonneuve, but since Expo 67 was just about to happen, it was decided to keep the original name in order not to confuse visitors. However, on January 1, 1988, as the Université-de-Montréal station was about to get inaugurated, all major universities who didn't have their name integrated with the station leading to its campuses had them added. Guy station added Concordia to become Guy-Concordia, and Berri-de-Montigny became Berri-UQAM. The name is still in effect today, but many people who used the station before the name change still refer to the station as Berri-de-Montigny.

This station has three levels of platform, and the higher the platform, the vaster it feels, with the Orange line being on top and feeling like the building we are in is of infinite proportions, then under it, there is the Green line which still feels vast compared to other stations but not as much as the Orange line platform, and then Yellow line is the deepest and most intimate.

The inside of the station is grandiose in the sense that it is so big. You can feel this as soon as you enter from the vast entrance on Berri & Sainte-Catherine, even from the outside as it is grandiose with its height and the many windows that are around it. Then, when you reach the concourse, you can see that, in order to accommodate passengers moving, there is a lot of empty space (with the exception of a granite bench), which helps make it look even bigger. There are many escalators to go between the different platforms. Parts of the platforms of the Orange have a view of the stairs going down toward the Green line. Those are the seats in front of the window with orange decals on them.

The volume of the station is very large on the main floor when you enter the station. There are a few stores, the main one was during many years the library "Le Parchemin", which has recently been replaced by an UQAM library. There is also the customer service centre of the STM as well as a few convenience stores located around the station.

There are several points of interest around the station, including Gare d'Autocars de Montréal, which is the intercity bus terminal, the UQAM University, Place Dupuis shopping centre, l'Hôtel des Gouverneurs, Place Emilie-Gamelin square, Theatre St-Denis and M Telus (formerly known as Metropolis) performing Arts centre.

The station has five entrances: 1500 Berri, 505 Sainte-Catherine East, 850 de Maisonneuve East, 1470 Saint-Denis and 1621 Berri.

In addition to metro transfers, passengers can transfer to intercity buses and the 747 STM bus route among others.


Unique Features

This station, which was where the metro inauguration took place, is the biggest of the network, the only one having 3 lines.

As there isn't a lot of space in the tail tracks behind the yellow line terminus, it is common to see trains on the yellow line switch tracks by going back in reverse from the terminus platform and then coming back in to get passengers by arriving to the platforms in Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke direction in the same way it usually arrives via Jean-Drapeau station.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Lines: 1 & 2 & 4
  • Previous Station: Saint-Laurent (Line 1) & Champ-de-Mars (Line 2).
  • Following Station: Beaudry (Line 1), Sherbrooke (Line 2) & Jean Drapeau (Line 4)
  • Entrances: 5

Public Artwork

The main art attraction in the station is the glass mural over the tunnel leading to Honoré-Beaugrand. It was made by Pierre Gaboriau and Pierre Osterrath and is called 'Hommage aux fondateurs de la ville de Montréal'. It was installed in 1969 after it was given by the Desjardins Group (Caisses Populaires Desjardins). The other main price of arts are paintings by Robert Lapalme, that are over the stairs leading to the Yellow Line.


Platform Photos


Interior Photos


Exterior Photos