Line 1 - Green Line

Côte-Vertu

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Côte Vertu is the western terminus of the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of the Boulevard de la Côte-Vertu.

The station has 3 entrances: 1515 Édouard-Laurin Boulevard, 1510 Boulevard de la Côte-Vertu and 1515 Boulevard de la Côte-Vertu. They are all attractive, in shades of brown with parts all in diagonal shapes. The mezzanine keeps the same tone of brown with beautiful brown bricks, but the shapes of its walls are more circular. The platforms are beautiful, with the same brown bricks which give a classic look, yet what is sometimes problematic is that it wasn't planned as a permanent terminus so the space is limited and it can take a long time to empty the platform when there are lots of passengers exiting a train in rush hour.

Points of interest include Les Galeries Norgate (a strip mall), as well as Vanier College and Cegep de Saint-Laurent.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This station is one of the few which has its own city bus terminal, serving both STM (Montreal) and STL (Laval).

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The overpass has stainless-steel murals by Yves Trudeau. They were originally supposed to continue on the walls of the stairwell, but the project was never completed.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: November 3, 1986
  • Line: 2
  • Following Station: Du Collège
  • Entrances: 3

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 8,215,913
  • Weekday Average: 29,799
  • Saturday Average: 14,625
  • Sunday Average: 11,292

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Du Collège

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Du Collège is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from the nearby rue du Collège, whose name commemorates the nearby Cégep de Saint-Laurent, which was originally inaugurated as a college in 1847.

The station has two entrances from the street level. Upon entering the station, beautiful illuminated stained glass frames the first escalator passageway, with others located along the outer walls of the mid-level. Once at the mezzanine, the ceiling forms a vaulting and sweeping line above, supported by majestic pillars. 

Beyond the fare gates, stairs and elevators give access to the side platforms of the station. In this area, the floor features various patterns such as circles and diamonds, in the tiled flooring. A warm red coloured brick makes up the walls of the platforms. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

The unique features of the station are the vaulting sweeping ceiling above the mezzanine, as well as the beautifully illuminated stained glass located between the entrance and the escalators.

The Ionic column on the mezzanine supporting the ceiling is unique in the metro system.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The are several stained-glass windows in the station, created by several different artists.

The northern entrance contains four stained glass windows, one created by Lyse Charland Favretti, and three created by Pierre Osterrath.

The southern entrance contains another stained-glass window Lyse Charland Favretti, as well as an abstract relief in brick by Aurelio Sandonato.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 9, 1984
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Côte-Vertu
  • Following Station: De La Savane
  • Entrances: 2

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 3,187,169
  • Weekday Average: 12,480
  • Saturday Average: 4,621
  • Sunday Average: 3,419

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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De La Savane

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De La Savane is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from nearby rue De La Savane.

De La Savane is one of the most visually stunning on the metro system. The rather ordinary entrance building on the surface hides quite well what is to be experienced inside.

From the moment of entering the station, it quickly becomes apparent that it is unlike most others. The walls and ceiling all have special mural-like treatments to them, featuring lots of rough or smooth angled lines and curves. The integrated light fixtures are round orbs, that protrude from the walls. All the elements combine to create something very organic, futuristic or other-worldly in this underground space. Once at the mezzanine level, a large metal sculpture, attached to the wall, reaches up and is illuminated by natural light entering from above.

Once past the fare gates, the side platforms are accessed from the sides. The arched lines of the tunnelled portion of the station, again featuring the orb-style lights, help continue the theme and look to the farthest reaches of the station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

De La Savane is unique in its consistent theme and look. From the orb lights to the special design treatment of the walls and ceiling, it is amazing to see the signature elements of the station maintained throughout and not just localized to one area. It definitely is a must-visit station on the Metro system.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main public artwork is a tall metal sculpture on the mezzanine level, entitled Calcite, created by Maurice Lemieux. Natural light entering from above helps illuminate the sculpture. The sculpture's name and shape are derived from the natural mineral calcite, which the artist predicted would be found in the rock surrounding the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 9, 1984
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Du Collège
  • Following Station: Namur
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 1,140,620
  • Weekday Average: 4,138
  • Saturday Average: 1,596
  • Sunday Average: 1,147

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Namur

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Namur is a station near the western terminus of the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro. 

It received its name from Rue Namur, which was the former name of a portion of Rue Jean-Talon. When the station opened in 1984, the street had been renamed. In 1980, Rue Arnoldi was renamed Rue Namur. There are several retail areas located in proximity to the station, as well as new high-rise/high-density residential developments, all within a short walk to the station.

The station has only one entrance, located at the north end of the station. This entrance has doors on both sides of the street corner it is located, facilitating access from multiple directions of arrival. When you enter inside, the station is fairly unassuming at street level, however heading down to the mezzanine level via two escalators, the sweeping and vaulting ceiling quickly comes into view as well as the main art installation, Système.

On the mezzanine level, there is a small Tabagie convenience store. Heading through to the fare gates, the station then directs people towards either the Côte-Vertu or Montmorency platforms. As previously mentioned, the station has only one entrance, which means you reach the platforms from their north end. The station was originally constructed with the intent of leaving open the possibility of having a second entrance on the other side of the Decarie highway, however to date, this has not been constructed.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The depth of the station combined with the public art piece that is suspended from the ceiling creates a unique look and feel for Namur station. The station's location just kilometres away from the A-40 / A-15 highway interchange allows it to offer easy access for those arriving from the west island and beyond, making it a popular choice to reach the metro network and the rest of the city.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main public art piece at Namur is entitled "Système", created by Quebec artist Pierre Granche. It is a giant illuminated sculpture made from aluminum, arranged in such a way that it appears like a long molecular or particle strand. It is very eye-catching and adds great character and uniqueness to the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 9, 1984
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: De La Savane
  • Following Station: Plamondon
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 2,721,639
  • Weekday Average: 9,735
  • Saturday Average: 5,807
  • Sunday Average: 4,498

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Plamondon

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Plamondon is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after nearby avenue Plamondon.

There are two entrances to Plamondon station. The standalone entrance features lots of glass windows and is framed with red accent pieces. Coming down into the station, it quickly becomes apparent that past the mezzanine area, the station has a mirror look to it. To help differentiate visually both sides, one is predominantly coloured blue, while the other is red.

Heading to the platforms, on the red side of the station, you will find stairs leading down on both sides. However, more interesting is the blue side, which has a stunning curved ramp leading down from the mezzanine to the platforms. The ramp extends beyond the stopping point of the train, so departing and arriving trains can easily be observed diving into the tunnel and exiting the station. 

At the halfway point of the platforms, there is a point where the red and blue sections meet with a mirrored circle in the middle. Elsewhere along the platforms, a stainless steel grill covers a ventilation pit, bringing in fresh air.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique feature of the station is certainly the blue side's ramp and arrangement of the track. Arriving and departing trains remain in the station itself slightly longer than in other stations due to the extended length of track around the ramps. The track also dives down and curves which add to the stunning effect created when trains arrive or depart.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 29, 1982
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Namur
  • Following Station: Côte-Sainte-Catherine
  • Entrances: 2 

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 4,275,310
  • Weekday Average: 14,566
  • Saturday Average: 8,932
  • Sunday Average: 7,507

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Côte-Sainte-Catherine

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Côte-Sainte-Catherine is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from the nearby chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, which itself was named after Saint Catherine of Alexandria.

The station features only one entrance, which contains a triangular-shaped arrangement of windows at the surface. Once inside the signature green, yellow and orange colour scheme quickly comes into view. Heading down to the mezzanine either by stairs or escalators, more coloured geometric murals along the walls come into view, adding a nice splash of colour to the space. During the descent, the space is open on one side to look down onto the mezzanine, emphasizing the large and open space. The path from the surface to the platforms takes the shape of a triangle, spiralling down to the lowest levels below ground.

The ceiling of the mezzanine is very high and slopes at a 45-degree angle, which in fact provides some views back up towards the entrance. Prior to passing through the fare gates, a convenience store is present, offering tasty beverages and treats to eager commuters. 

The platforms are partially open to the space above, again taking advantage of the extremely high sloped ceiling and space. The platforms are decorated with angular cut-outs in the wall and feature yellow bucket seating.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The fact that you can easily see down into the mezzanine from the levels above, as well as the opposite of seeing up from the platforms, is quite unique. The large, cavernous and open space of the station interior is in direct contrast to the relatively small entrance building at the surface.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is a series of murals throughout the station, that were created by Gilbert Sauvé. In total, eight brightly coloured murals help direct passengers through the station to the exit. They are presented as a combination of green, yellow and orange patterns.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1982
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Plamondon
  • Following Station: Snowdon
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 2,404,527
  • Weekday Average: 8,226
  • Saturday Average: 4,614
  • Sunday Average: 3,931

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Snowdon

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Snowdon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of the Snowdon neighbourhood, which also happens to host three more stations (Côté Sainte-Catherine, Côte-des-Neiges and Villa-Maria).

The station has only one entrance, on 5111 Queen-Mary Road. It has a beautiful design, and it is part of an office building of the STM. Having four storeys, the two higher levels are longer than the second level, who is longer than the first. That means you walk under the higher levels to enter the station. Once in, there are quick stairs that lead to the ticket booth and turnstiles, followed by escalators that give an awesome view of the lights suspended from the ceiling that are put on circles that do a nice pattern.

Once you are at the bottom of the stairs, you reach the central tunnel, as the station was built in three tunnels, the central one for the passengers to walk to their destinations and go up and down the different platforms, while the two other tunnels are the tracks and platforms. The tunnels are connected to each other via cross-tunnels.

The upper level has the terminus platform of the Blue line, called the Snowdon platform, and on the other side is the Côte Vertu platform on the Orange line. On both sides, train doors open on the left. On the lower levels, trains go in the opposite direction and doors open on the right.

The colours of the station are mainly tones of brown.

The main point of interest is Saint Joseph's Oratory, which is approximately mid-way between Snowdon and Côte-des-Neiges stations. There is also the Décarie autoroute which passes just next to the Snowdon station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

While this section is usually one of the hardest to fill on most stations, this one won't be hard to fill. First of all, since the platforms are built in individual tunnels, they have unique shapes of half circles. Also, the way the cross-tunnels are built, you can wait for your train in them and get a much grandiose view which is quite unique in the network. Since the upper platform doors open on the left, that is also quite unique.

Another unique feature of the station is the maps that are used in the station are different shapes than the rest of the maps in the network (Snowdon is more square while others are more rectangular). They are put on some cubic boxes with lights inside. Some old school metrophiles enjoyed the fact that it stayed many years with older maps, which included old station names (like Berri-de-Montigny instead of Berri-UQAM) and still had Henri-Bourassa as the terminus of the orange line. Snowdon is also the only station of the network to have been the terminus of two lines, as it was the western terminus of the orange line in 1981. Finally, Snowdon is the only terminus station of the network that has stacked platforms.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The station's main artwork is wall murals by Claude Guité, which are situated on the walls that passengers look at while waiting for their train (the wall behind which trains passed by). Those murals represent each season, and they are spring (Montmorency platform), summer (Saint-Michel), autumn (Snowdon) and winter (Côté Vertu).

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7 1981 (Line 2) & January 4 1988 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Côte-Sainte-Catherine (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Villa-Maria (Line 2) & Côte-des-Neiges (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 1

 STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 4,510,487
  • Weekday Average: 16,074
  • Saturday Average: 9,612
  • Sunday Average: 7,394
The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019.

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Villa-Maria

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Villa-Maria is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name originates from the nearby Villa Maria school.

The station has one entrance, which is of a decent size and is contained by a bus loop that wraps around the station. Heading down to the mezzanine level, there is a large convenience store located just before the fare gates. This is also the first spot to see the station's signature yellow, two-tone orange and red stripes, which feature prominently throughout.

After passing through the fare gates, more escalators and stairs are found around the corner, which leads to the mid-level before the platforms. This area is bathed in natural sunlight, which is allowed inside by means of a large light shaft found above the escalators. Large colourful notched circles rest on stainless steel pegs sticking out from the wall. Stairs on both sides of the mid-level give access to each of the platforms. Above the tunnelled portion of the station, there are large orange vent ducts, made in the same colour as the rest of the decor to nicely blend in. The signature coloured stripes can be found all along the platform floors, with matching seating protruding from the walls. It is a very nice visual cue that quickly identifies the station to travellers without needing signage.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The signature look of the station created by the yellow, two-tone orange and red stripes on the floors and seating gives Villa-Maria station a very recognizable visual identity.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is "Circles" created by André Léonard. There are two murals each consisting of five dial-shaped polymer concrete disks, each resting on a stainless-steel peg. Each disc is rotated 45 degrees from its neighbour, which creates a feeling of movement and directionality.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7, 1981
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Snowdon
  • Following Station: Vendôme
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 3,382,119
  • Weekday Average: 12,420
  • Saturday Average: 6,120
  • Sunday Average: 4,602

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Vendôme

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Vendôme is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after the nearby avenue de Vendôme. This station is one of the few on the metro that connects with the exo commuter trains. 

This station's primary roles are to serve the adjacent McGill University Health Centre, as well as the exo commuter train lines to Vaudreuil-Hudson, Saint-Jérôme and Candiac, in addition to serving the region's residents.

The station has three entrances. One is the original entrance building, the second is a new entrance that was opened in 2021, which provides accessible access to the station, and a third entrance via the underground tunnel between the station, exo and the hospital.

The original entrance is made up of concrete, metal vent grills and curved windows. The new entrance is entirely made up of glass windows and is large, bright and very inviting. This entrance was created as the original entrance would have been too complex to integrate elevators to render it accessible. From either entrance, you can the platforms, however, both have their own mezzanine and fare gates. Access to the exo trains can also be reached from within the station.

Once inside, the platforms can be accessed by stairs or elevators (depending on the entrance). The platform area features a beautiful stained glass window with a stainless steel sculpture suspended above the tracks. Rounded red rectangular light strips run from one end of the platform to the other and provide a unique look to the station. Hexagonal floor tiles and bare concrete walls, along with red benches make up the rest of the look of the platforms. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

Unique features of this station include its connection to the exo commuter trains, being one of only a select few that offer this intermodal connection. The length between Vendôme and Place-Saint-Henri is also the longest distance between two stations on the island of Montreal. The same segment of track between the two stations also features several hard curves back and forth creating one of the more exciting portions of track to ride on the network.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main art installation is a beautiful stained-glass window and stainless-steel sculpture that can be viewed from the far end of the mezzanine and the platforms. It was created by Marcelle Ferron, and scatters changing colours of light into the station. The STM shared that the sculpture was originally intended to create sounds from the wind created by the passing metro trains through the station.

A second artwork was installed in 2021 as part of the new secondary entrance. It is a blue mosaic located at the top of the stairs of the entrance, which was created by Patrick Bernatchez.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7, 1981
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Villa-Maria
  • Following Station: Place-Saint-Henri
  • Entrances: 3

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 7,332,409
  • Weekday Average: 27,184
  • Saturday Average: 11,751
  • Sunday Average: 8,923

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Place-Saint-Henri

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Place-Saint-Henri is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after a street and public square located between rue Saint-Jacques and rue Notre-Dame.

The station has 3 entrances, two of which are located in bus loops, while the third is an open-air entrance (one of only three on the Metro, with Bonaventure and Square-Victoria-OACI being the other two). 

The entrances are bright with lots of windows, allowing plenty of natural light to enter the space. The stairs that lead down to the mezzanine level are showered in even more natural light thanks to skylights positioned above. The framing for the windows casts beautiful shadows that move with the passage of the day, and transform this area into a grand staircase, regardless of whether you are going up or down.

The mezzanine contains the fare gates. Off to the side of this area is a bench with a glassed-in stainless steel structure, which protrudes and opens up to the train platform area below.

Continuing down more escalators to reach the train platforms and the full size and scale of the station quickly becomes apparent. In this area, the ceiling is spectacularly high and tapers down to match up with the tunnelled section at the far end of the station. Florescent lighting is integrated into the ceiling to help highlight this architectural delight. 

The platforms themselves are decorated with various shades of yellow to red tiling on the walls, which starts off as yellow by the stairs and escalators and gradually becomes a dark red in the far distance. Simple wooden benches finish off the look of the platforms by providing a clean look throughout.

UNIQUE FEATURES

There are a few architectural features that add to the uniqueness of Place-Saint-Henri station. The first is the grand staircase by the main entrance, which is both large, open and bright, creating a great first or last impression of the station. The second is the sweeping ceiling of the platforms that tapers down as it moves away from the escalators. The same goes for the coloured wall tiles that darken with increasing distance.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There are three artworks in this station. The first is "Bonheur d'occasion' created by Julien Hébert. A mural of coloured glazed bricks creating the words Bonheur d'occasion is embedded on the mezzanine level and located just after passing through the fare gates. The second is a metal sculpture created by Jacques de Tonnancour, and is six truncated cylinders, made of aluminum, painted steel and stainless steel. It is located at one end of the mezzanine level and hangs through the floor into the platform area. Interestingly, the sculpture was originally planned to rotate by a motor. The third art piece is a copper and wood statue of Jacques Cartier (who discovered the St. Lawrence River), created by Joseph-Arthur Vincent in 1893. The statue had been damaged by the passage of time, and the City of Montreal restored it and then relocated it inside the station for protection from the elements in 2001.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Vendôme
  • Following Station: Lionel-Groulx
  • Entrances: 3

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 2,867,001
  • Weekday Average: 10,224
  • Saturday Average: 5,200
  • Sunday Average: 3,817

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Lionel-Groulx

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Lionel-Groulx is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Green and Orange lines.

This station was initially going to be called Albert but following the death of Lionel Groulx, who was a Roman Catholic priest, his name was given to the station before it opened. In recent years, there have been demands to change the Lionel-Groulx name because of antisemitism comments he made. Jazz pianist Oscar Peterson has been suggested as a possible replacement because he grew up in this area.

Like most transfer stations, it has two levels of platforms, however, what is great with Lionel-Groulx is the way it is made, you can see all four trains at the same time from the top level as if you look around the escalators, you can see the lower platform and since the lower level trains are closer to the centre as the upper-level trains (the upper-level platform goes over the lower level trains), they are easy to see. Also, if you stand on the right side of the platform on the upper level, you can see trains move up the hill as they arrive, which is the only station where you can see the tires of the train you are going to board as it arrives. You can also see the train at the lower level departing by being at the same spot.

It is one of the stations where the architecture is most worth seeing. With its orange floors as well as granite walls and ceiling, it is truly a classic. It gives you an impression you are not in a subway station but in a large complex where the subway just happens to enter.

The main destination around the station is the Atwater Market. There is only one entrance, 620 Atwater Street.

The station has two central platforms, although technically each line has stacked platforms as it is made to facilitate transfers so that passengers can switch lines without taking the stairs. Passengers going downtown can switch on the lower platform and those going to the Western parts of the lines can switch on the upper platform. Transfers between Green and Orange lines (even though the stairs) are also quicker to do here than at Berri-UQAM due to the station layout, and some passengers can actually save time by going to an extra station to do their transfer here (For example, someone from the northeast part of the Orange line going to Atwater will get there quicker switching at Lionel-Groulx than Berri). Lionel-Groulx is also better arranged than Snowdon for the moment as the majority of passengers transferring at Snowdon need to take the stairs, as Snowdon was built assuming that line 5 would be expanded to the West, which never happened.

Lionel-Groulx was built as a transfer station from the start, yet it opened on the Green line first, on September 3, 1978, as opposed to April 28 1980 for the Orange line.

There is a Couche-Tard convenience store and a Cafe Depot coffee shop, and a souvenir shop selling various accessories on the upper platform, as well as a Van Houtte coffee shop and Tabatout convenience store on the lower one.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is one of only 5 stations to have a different layout than side platforms. Also, the trains on the lower platform open their doors on the left.

The station was featured (along with Radisson) in the movie "The Jackal", where Lionel-Groulx was arranged to pass for the Metro Center station in Washington, D.C.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The artwork of the station is a wood sculpture called "The Tree of Life", by Italian sculptor Joseph Rifesser. It is on the mezzanine level and represents 5 different faces from the 5 continents, and also a pair of stainless steel mural sculptures by station architect Yves Roy, is also on the mezzanine level, which can also be seen on the higher platform.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978 (Line 1) & April 28, 1980 (Line 2)
  • Line: 1 & 2
  • Previous Station: Charlevoix (Line 1) & Place-Saint-Henri (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Atwater (Line 1) & Georges-Vanier (Line 2)
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 5,154,838
  • Weekday Average: 17,511
  • Saturday Average: 11,920
  • Sunday Average: 9,484

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Georges-Vanier

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Georges-Vanier is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named for the nearby boulevard Georges-Vanier, which itself was named for the Rt. Hon. Georges-Philias Vanier.

The station features only one entrance and is located in a residential area, just outside of downtown Montréal. The station has a very clean and conservative look with the dark tile floor and brick walls. From the entrance to the mezzanine and finally to the platforms, the path taken is a bit long and windy but interesting all the same.

Once past the fare gates, the main art installation of the station comes into view. It is a large concrete tree, illuminated from a single skylight at the surface. Passing alongside the tree are the accesses and walkways to the platforms.

At the platform level, the decor changes in the tunnelled portion of the station to be various shades of blue ceramic tiles on the walls. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

Georges-Vanier is located between Lionel-Groulx and Lucien L'Allier, two fairly busy stations, yet this station is very quiet by comparison. Overall, the station was ranked last in terms of passenger entries for 2019, and as a result, is often very quiet and calm. With the nice seating on the mezzanine near the tree, it can be a nice spot to sit down and rest.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is entitled "Un arbre dans le parc" and was created by Michel Dernuet. It is a large concrete pillar in the shape of a tree, that has illumination integrated into its branches. The tree is located on the Côte-Vertu side of the platforms, while the Montmorency side features blue ceramics, which symbolize a fresh spring in the woods.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Lionel-Groulx
  • Following Station: Lucien-L'Allier
  • Entrances: 1

 STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 1,047,247
  • Weekday Average: 3,700
  • Saturday Average: 2,066
  • Sunday Average: 1,582
The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019.

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Lucien-L'Allier

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Lucien L'Allier is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of rue Lucien L'Allier, which was named in honour of Lucien L'Allier, an engineer who was a former chairman of the Montreal Transit Commission (which today is the STM) and built the metro. Prior to his death, the planned name for the station was Aqueduc.

The station has only one entrance, on 955 Lucien L'Allier street. It is a beautiful square building in brown bricks with some windows. As soon as you enter, you can see the brown bricks are a pattern of this station and will be there everywhere. The concourse looks very big with a high ceiling that gives a grandiose impression to the station. Again, all the walls are covered in brown bricks with the exception of a firewall made in glass.

Once you reach the platforms, which are among the deepest in the network, the impression is of a much smaller space. Even the benches are made in brown bricks, yet a different pattern.

The biggest point of interest is the Bell Centre. It is home to the Montreal Canadiens but also the place where world-renowned artists come to do their shows while in Montreal. In addition, combat sports like wrestling, boxing and MMA also do shows there. To accommodate the many spectators who use the subway to attend the Bell Centre, the station was modified to include direct access to the building.

Another place of interest is the E-Commerce Place, which is an office tower for many electronic commerce firms, most notably CGI.

UNIQUE FEATURES

It is one of the few stations that connect to the exo commuter trains.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There is a sculptural grille by Jean-Jacques Besner that covers the ventilation shaft at the entrance. It was based on old aqueducts as the original name of the station was supposed to be Aqueduc.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Georges-Vanier
  • Following Station: Bonaventure
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 2,526,024
  • Weekday Average: 9,280
  • Saturday Average: 5,859
  • Sunday Average: 3,315

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Bonaventure

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Bonaventure is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro, and its original Western terminus from its opening in 1966 until the extension that made several stations rotate as the terminus, from Place Saint-Henri in 1980 to Côte-Vertu, which is the terminus since 1986.

It was named in honour of Place Bonaventure, which is an office complex and hotel.

The station has two official entrances: 1166 de la Gauchetière West, and 955 de la Cathédrale. There are four more entrances through Place Bonaventure, Château Champlain, the 1000 de la Gauchetière complex, and the 1250 René-Lévesque West complex.

Due to it being in a busy downtown sector, which also includes the Montreal Central Station which is the terminus of the intercity trains, the entrances are all integrated into buildings. The one just in front of Windsor Station, the former train station that is now transformed into a food complex, is also stairs directly on the sidewalk that reminds us of many American and European stations.

The mezzanine is very vast and grandiose. It has vaults which are beautiful. The lights suspended from the ceiling are also spectacular. Any visitor who arrives in Montreal by train will have the impression they are still in the train station due to the ancient but classic architecture.

The station has two side platforms that are also beautiful in addition to being quite large, which is practical for travellers who have luggage. The same style of lights from the mezzanine also are present on the platforms. They bring a nice contrast to the darkness created by the brown colour tone of the platforms.

The many points of interest are the Montreal Central Station for trains, the access to Montreal Underground, the Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral, Windsor Station, the Chateau Champlain hotel, the 1000 de la Gauchetière complex, Place Bonaventure and Place Ville-Marie complexes, as well as the headquarters of the STM.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This station is connected to the intercity train station which makes many travellers enter the Montreal Metro through it. The station also connects with commuter rail as well as buses from Longueuil.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The lights (and everything that holds them) are probably the biggest piece of art. The entry via Windsor Station is also beautiful architecture, just like the mezzanine. This station proves that despite not having specific pieces of art, it is more than beautiful.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: February 13, 1967
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Lucien L'Allier
  • Following Station: Square-Victoria-OACI
  • Entrances: 2 official, 4 unofficial

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 9,430,502
  • Weekday Average: 36,492
  • Saturday Average: 12,730
  • Sunday Average: 9,552

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Square-Victoria - OACI

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Square-Victoria-OACI is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro. It was briefly the Western terminus of the line for 1 week, from its opening to the opening of Bonaventure station.

It was originally named just Square-Victoria, in honour of Victoria Square, which is a famous town square in Montreal. In 2014, this station became one of the many that had its name modified after the STM added OACI as the International Civil Aviation Organization (whose French acronym is OACI) has its headquarters in the proximity of the station.

The station has 8 entrances, which include: 605 Belmont, 601 Viger, 601 Saint-Antoine West and 605 Saint-Jacques West. The most famous of them is the one one Saint-Antoine which replicates the entry of many stations of the Paris Metro made by Hector Guimard. There are stairs leading below ground from the sidewalk, and around them are green fencing and on top of it is a sign in green and yellow with the word "METROPOLITAIN", and it was a gift from RATP, the Paris equivalent of the STM. The Belmont entry is also original as although it leads to the station, it does so via a long tunnel.

The concourse is quite large, yet doesn't really stand out. The side platforms have beautiful bricks of different colours, from brown to white.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The Guimard entrance as it is the only direct link to the Paris Metro on the Montreal Metro. It is also part of Montreal Underground. This station also has the most entrances of any station on the Metro, numbering at 8.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Again, the Guimard entrance belongs here. Guimard is one of the most famous artists in the "Art Nouveau" style, and having one of his works in the network is very prestigious.

There is also a mural by Jean-Paul Mousseau (who also did work at Peel station) at the Belmont entrance. It consists of yellow and green stripes with orange triangles inside them.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: February 6, 1967
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Bonaventure
  • Following Station: Place-d'Armes
  • Entrances: 4

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 6,841,357
  • Weekday Average: 25,893
  • Saturday Average: 6,252
  • Sunday Average: 4,449

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Place-d'Armes

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Place-d'Armes is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after nearby Place d'Armes located to the south, a French name for a rallying point for a fort's defenders.

This station is connected to the sprawling Palais des Congress de Montéal. It is also connected to the RESO Underground City network of pathways. Other nearby destinations include the Old Montreal tourist area, Chinatown, Montreal Science Centre, Palais de justice de Montréal, Notre-Dame Basilica, Musée Pointe-à-Callière, Cirque du Soleil, just to name a few.

The station layout is quite simple, with entrances located at both ends. One entrance leads outside near Chinatown, while the other leads directly inside the Palais des congrès de Montréal.

A large and open Mezzanine area runs the length of the ground level of the station. Fare gates are located to the sides, to allow people to pass through the station. A skylight that runs the length of the station helps bring natural light to the mezzanine.

The depth of the station platforms is quite shallow at only 4.6m below ground. As a result, the trip from the mezzanine to the platforms is quick and short, either by stairs or elevators.

At the platform level, they are covered in a combination of yellow walls, concrete and brushed stainless steel panels (notably by the seating areas). Also at the platforms are some small glass exhibit cabinets, typically featuring archeological discoveries.

UNIQUE FEATURES

What makes the station unique is how well it integrates alongside the Palais des congrès building. Its shallow depth and wide open mezzanine area function very well for its use as a transit station as well as a popular gathering point.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork of this station is entitled "Soleil de minuit" and was installed in 2017 on the mezzanine just past the fare gates. It is a combination of various types of glass, steel and epoxy resin, all illuminated by an LED backlight. "On 21 June 2015, the first day of summer and the longest day of the year, the sun rose in Brussels. At the same time, in Montreal, it was almost midnight." The artist used a spectrophotometer to measure the light spectrum of these first rays of the Brussels summer, and designed this series of stained glass windows which reproduce the intense colours of these natural lights.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Square-Victoria-OACI
  • Following Station: Champ-de-Mars
  • Entrances: 2

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 6,986,287
  • Weekday Average: 22,467
  • Saturday Average: 13,513
  • Sunday Average: 10,244

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Champ-de-Mars

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Champ-de-Mars is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from the nearby Champ-de-Mars park that faces Montreal City Hall. The name is the French term for a military parade ground.

This is a rather simple station in both size and layout, however, it sees quite a high volume of passengers due to the nearby destinations as well as it being a popular point of access to the Old Montreal tourist area. The station has one entrance building, which has underground connectivity to the nearby CHUM hospital and medical centre across the street. Surface pedestrian connections provide access to the Old Montreal area.

The station itself has lots of natural light, in part due to the large windows that surround the station building. A beautiful stained glass window created by Quebec artist Marcelle Ferron, showers the mezzanine level in multicoloured light.

Heading down to the platforms, the station is accessible by stairs and elevators. The platform level is located very close to the surface. Lightly beige tiled floor with green accent tiles and tiled walls colour the large platforms. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique feature of the station is its bright and inviting mezzanine thanks to the large windows that wrap around the station. The very shallow depth of the platforms is also quite unique and places it among the least deep in the system.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The large stained-glass window at Champ-de-Mars station was installed in 1968 and was created by Quebec artist Marcelle Ferron. They were the first non-figurative art to be placed in the Metro. The stained-glass window casts beautiful light rays throughout the mezzanine and is stunning to see, day or night.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Place-d'Armes
  • Following Station: Berri-UQAM
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 4,188,317
  • Weekday Average: 13,387
  • Saturday Average: 6,963
  • Sunday Average: 5,508

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Berri-UQAM

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Berri-UQAM is the main transfer station of the Montreal Metro, serving all three of the original lines (Green, Orange, Yellow).

The station was originally called Berri-de-Montigny as it was at the corner of Berri and de Montigny streets. However, since the name of de Montigny street changed to de Maisonneuve soon after the opening, the station was going to change its name to Berri-de-Maisonneuve, but since Expo 67 was just about to happen, it was decided to keep the original name in order not to confuse visitors. However, on January 1, 1988, as the Université-de-Montréal station was about to get inaugurated, all major universities that didn't have their name integrated with the station leading to its campuses had them added. Guy station added Concordia to become Guy-Concordia, and Berri-de-Montigny became Berri-UQAM. The name is still in effect today, but many people who used the station before the name change still refer to the station as Berri-de-Montigny.

This station has three levels of platform, and the higher the platform, the vaster it feels, with the Orange line being on top and feeling like the building we are in is of infinite proportions, then under it, there is the Green line which still feels vast compared to other stations but not as much as the Orange line platform, and then Yellow line is the deepest and most intimate.

The inside of the station is grandiose in the sense that it is so big. You can feel this as soon as you enter from the vast entrance on Berri & Sainte-Catherine, even from the outside as it is grandiose with its height and the many windows that are around it. Then, when you reach the concourse, you can see that, in order to accommodate passengers moving, there is a lot of empty space (with the exception of a granite bench), which helps make it look even bigger. There are many escalators to go between the different platforms. Parts of the platforms of the Orange have a view of the stairs going down toward the Green line. Those are the seats in front of the window with orange decals on them.

The volume of the station is very large on the main floor when you enter the station. There are a few stores, the main one was during many years the library "Le Parchemin", which has recently been replaced by a UQAM library. There is also the customer service centre of the STM as well as a few convenience stores located around the station.

There are several points of interest around the station, including Gare d'Autocars de Montréal, which is the intercity bus terminal, the UQAM University, Place Dupuis shopping centre, l'Hôtel des Gouverneurs, Place Emilie-Gamelin square, Theatre St-Denis and M Telus (formerly known as Metropolis) Performing Arts centre.

The station has five entrances: 1500 Berri, 505 Sainte-Catherine East, 850 de Maisonneuve East, 1470 Saint-Denis and 1621 Berri.

In addition to metro transfers, passengers can transfer to intercity buses and the 747 STM bus route among others.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This station, which was where the metro inauguration took place, is the biggest of the network, the only one having 3 lines.

As there isn't a lot of space in the tail tracks behind the yellow line terminus, it is common to see trains on the yellow line switch tracks by going back in reverse from the terminus platform and then coming back in to get passengers by arriving to the platforms in Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke direction in the same way it usually arrives via Jean-Drapeau station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main art attraction in the station is the glass mural over the tunnel leading to Honoré-Beaugrand. It was made by Pierre Gaboriau and Pierre Osterrath and is called 'Hommage aux fondateurs de la ville de Montréal'. It was installed in 1969 after it was given by the Desjardins Group (Caisses Populaires Desjardins). The other main pieces of art are paintings by Robert Lapalme, that are over the stairs leading to the Yellow Line.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Lines: 1 & 2 & 4
  • Previous Station: Saint-Laurent (Line 1) & Champ-de-Mars (Line 2).
  • Following Station: Beaudry (Line 1), Sherbrooke (Line 2) & Jean Drapeau (Line 4)
  • Entrances: 5

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 12,640,200
  • Weekday Average: 45,834
  • Saturday Average: 26,485
  • Sunday Average: 20,955

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Sherbrooke

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Sherbrooke is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after the nearby rue Sherbrooke, which itself was named after Sir John Coape Sherbrooke, who served as governor-general of British North America from 1816-1818.

This station has two entrances, both integrated into buildings (one of which is an apartment). The station passes underneath rue Berri, with entrances located on both sides of the street. The entrances themselves are rather plain and lead down to the mezzanine, one level below. 

Once at the mezzanine, the ceiling turns into a nice purple grill, covering the lights found within. There is some retail located on the mezzanine level.

Heading down to the platforms, the ceiling changes to become a light beige colour along with the tiles on the walls. Purple accent strips are scattered along the platforms reaching from floor to ceiling. There are also black marble or granite columns in the central area, which is quite large and wide.

The seating along the platforms is provided by purple chairs, that partially resemble the seats on the older MR-73 metro trains in shape and size.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The prominent use of the colour purple in the station, from the ceiling grill on the mezzanine to the purple stripes along the platforms and the purple seating, gives Sherbrooke station a signature theme and colour to call its own.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There are several artworks in Sherbrooke station. The first is entitled "Horizons" by Mario Mercola, which is a circular mural in orange porphyry, helping to brighten the exit leading to the Place du Cercle tower. The second is entitled "Mosaic" by Gabriel Bastien & Andrea Vau and is a Venetian marble depicting the founding banquet of the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste. The third art piece entitled "Rivières", once again by Mario Merola, is a mural done in brick and is a rhythmic pattern of brown bricks.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Berri-UQAM
  • Following Station: Mont-Royal
  • Entrances: 2

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 4,587,301
  • Weekday Average: 15,809
  • Saturday Average: 9,431
  • Sunday Average: 7,004

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Mont-Royal

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Mont-Royal is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Mount Royal Avenue, whose french name is "Mont-Royal'.

The station has a unique entrance, at 470 Mount Royal East. The mezzanine is nice and can be similar to the ones at Beaudry and Berri-UQAM where you get the doors in the middle with windows all around and over it. Once inside, you find the escalators and stairs who are quite dark compared to other stations. Then the only ticket booth is placed just before the stairs that lead to the side platforms, which are all in beautiful brown bricks, from the walls to the benches to the floors.

In 2022, a new entrance was opened that allowed the station to become accessible with elevators. As a result, there are additional stairwells available in addition to the previously existing stairs and escalators of the station.

Places of interest include the famous Montreal theatre "Théâtre du Rideau-Vert, as well as the commercial street Mount Royal Avenue.

UNIQUE FEATURES

All of the station was built in a tunnel except for the ticket booth.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

A poem by Gérald Godin, "Tango de Montréal", was put on the wall of the station by a group called "Les industries perdues".

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Sherbrooke
  • Following Station: Laurier
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 5,403,116
  • Weekday Average: 16,924
  • Saturday Average: 14,495
  • Sunday Average: 10,661

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Laurier

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Laurier is a station on the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro. It was named in honour of Laurier avenue, which got its name from former Canadian Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

There are two entrances, at 5113 Rivard and 495 Gilford. While neither stands out from the outside, the one on Rivard street is special inside because it has automatic entry doors. This is one of only four stations in the network that have this feature and the only one not on the Blue line. The one on Gilford, however, has the utility of having way more space so people can wait for buses inside, which is handy in the winter when you wait for certain bus routes that pass less frequently.

The side platforms are elegant with their granite wall but what lacks in them is that exits are only at the extremities and each one leads to a different entrance, which means passengers who are not aware may have to walk all over backwards to exit at their preferred spot.

The ceilings are quite low due to the station being built in a tunnel-like its neighbour Mont-Royal.

Places of interest include Ecole nationale de théâtre, and Ecole supérieure de la danse au Québec.

UNIQUE FEATURES

Laurier station platforms couldn't be described without mentioning the spots on the walls over the benches, which are the results of oil on people's hair getting into the granite.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

This station does not have any artwork. The granite walls on the platforms may be the only thing that is worth looking at there.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Mont-Royal
  • Following Station: Rosemont
  • Entrances: 2

 STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 4,996,694
  • Weekday Average: 17,266
  • Saturday Average: 10,319
  • Sunday Average: 7,565
The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019.

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Rosemont

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Rosemont is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name originates from the nearby boulevard Rosemont.

The station has only one entrance, which is integrated into the ground floor of a building. Escalators and stairs quickly lead people down to the mezzanine level below. Throughout the station, various shades of red tiling adorn the station and create its unique look.

The mezzanine area is rather large and long and leads directly to the access of the platforms. A large and wide walkway crosses the tracks below to grant access to the opposite platform. 

The ceiling in this area is rather high and is painted black and not illuminated. This creates the impression that you are outdoors in the evening. Nice red tiled columns rise up from the floor and reach the ceiling. The seating areas are recessed into the walls with the signature red tiles at their back. 

All these elements combine to create a very tasteful and pleasant station, that is both easy to navigate and calming to be in.

UNIQUE FEATURES

What makes Rosemont unique is the frequent use of the red shaded tiling, which is present throughout the station. Whether it is found on the wall above the escalators near the entrance, on the walkway and pillars in the mezzanine and platforms, to even on the seating areas, the use of the colour red is an undeniable identifying element of this beautiful station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Laurier
  • Following Station: Beaubien
  • Entrances: 1

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 3,355,489
  • Weekday Average: 11,786
  • Saturday Average: 5,728
  • Sunday Average: 4,183

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Jean-Talon

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Jean-Talon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of Jean-Talon street, which was named in honour of Jean Talon, who was intendant of New France.

The station has four entrances, 7100 Berri, 430 Jean-Talon East, 522 Jean-Talon East, and a fully automated entrance on 780 Jean-Talon East. The entrances are all nice and attractive, each being more independent looking than the others. Having been built in different eras, they constitute a good mix of materials and colours, and each one has its own charm.

The Orange line was originally the only one at this station, and its side platforms are the highest. Their design is relatively modest, with the majority of the walls and floor being in tones of grey. The floor around the sections which lead to the Blue line are orange as a way of showing those who arrive that this is the Orange line platform. Since the Blue line service ends earlier, there are grills that can be closed when it's not in service.

In order to link the Orange line and Blue line platforms, large volumes were built on both sides of the station. They are beautiful, with orange and blue flooring and greyish walls. Directional panels are suspended from the ceiling, and are also in orange and blue, with their look similar to those at Snowdon, although there they are installed on the walls instead of from the ceiling. Also in these spaces, you can see some chazy limestone, which is the rock from which the station was built.

In order not to close the Orange line when the Blue line was built, the Blue line was built with stacked platforms. The Snowdon platform is the upper one. Trains on this platform have doors opening on the left. The highlight of this platform is a wall mural by Judith Bricault Klein that represents the transfer between the two lines. The Saint-Michel platform is lower and despite having a blue floor and blue seats (like the Snowdon platform), the walls are more in tones of grey and brown.

Points of interest include Plaza Saint-Hubert, which is a group of stores and restaurants grouped together, and also Jean-Talon market, Little Italy, as well as Tour Jean-Talon, which is an office tower from which an entry to the station is integrated.

UNIQUE FEATURES

One unique feature is the stacked platforms on the Blue line which also result in trains on Snowdon platforms having doors open on the left. It is also the only station in the network that was built as a single-line station and was changed into a transfer station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

One of the most beautiful artworks in all the network is Judith Bricault Klein's enamelled steel mural of 256 panels. Another great piece of art is Gilbert Sauvé's mural on both of the Blue line platforms, which are blue arrows combined with orange circles on concrete which indicate the direction the trains are going.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966 (Line 2) & June 16, 1986 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Beaubien (Line 2) & De Castelnau (Line 5)
  • Following Station: Jarry (Line 2) & Fabre (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 4

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 5,272,433
  • Weekday Average: 16,808
  • Saturday Average: 13,897
  • Sunday Average: 10,264

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Jarry

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Jarry is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. The station is named after rue Jarry, which itself was named after Bernard Bleinier dit Jarry.

The station is in proximity to Parc Jarry, one of the large parks in the City of Montreal, although De Castelnau and Parc stations are physically closer.

The station has two entrances, one is a standalone entrance building, while the other is integrated into the ground floor of an apartment building built above. Long escalators connect the entrance to the mezzanine level underneath. On the mezzanine, the ceiling is made almost like a honeycomb, with illumination in each cell. The floor is mostly white tile, however, there are artistic circle formations of coloured tiles near the fare gates and the start of the overhead walkway to cross to the other platform access.

The walkway itself is long and narrow, with low sides, drawing attention to the contrast between the lightly coloured walkway and the darker platform area below.

Once at platform level, the floor changes to an assortment of various dark brown coloured tiles, framed with stainless steel benches for seating along the sides.

UNIQUE FEATURES

An interesting aspect of this station is how one of its entrances is integrated with the ground level of an apartment building. Another is the unique honeycomb ceiling.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There isn't any official artwork at this station, however, outside of the main entrance, there is a concrete overhang canopy, which has been painted by street artists, providing colour to the exterior entrance area of the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Jean-Talon
  • Following Station: Crémazie
  • Entrances: 2

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 3,320,365
  • Weekday Average: 11,302
  • Saturday Average: 7,097
  • Sunday Average: 5,294

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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Crémazie

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Crémazie is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Boulevard Crémazie, a frontage road parallel to Autoroute 40. The boulevard was named in honour of French Canadian poet and bookseller Octave Crémazie.

The station has two entrances. The main one is the northern entrance. Originally the mezzanine was quite small, it had a square shape and was just as high as the doors. The front of the roof was sky blue, which was appropriate as it matched the colour of the metro cars. In 1992, the FTQ built its headquarters there and the entrance of the subway was integrated into the new building. The pale colours of the new building match well with the pale beige colours of the inside of the station. The entrance is covered by the floor over it, which is great for passengers wanting to wait for the bus on a rainy day. As a bonus, there is also a mailbox right next to it so you can drop off your mail before taking the subway. The southern entrance is inside another building but the only thing there is some stairs that lead to an underground corridor that goes under Crémazie boulevard to reach the north side.

The northern entrance has two sets of stairs, on the left are the escalators and on the right the regular stairs. Once you reach the bottom of the stairs, you have the ticket booth on the right and the turnstiles in front. The walls and floor are all beige motifs. Then you take another escalator and while on it you will see how grandiose the station, situated at its right, looks. The lighting is wonderfully done with the ceiling having many squares and some of them being illuminated.

You can reach the Côte-Vertu platform by taking the stairs just next to the escalators or going on the overpass to reach the Montmorency platform.

Points of interest include the FTQ complex, as well as Collège André-Grasset which are quite close to the station. Then if you go through St-Hubert street in the northern direction you can find Collège Ahuntsic and Complexe sportif Claude-Robillard, which is recognized as a training facility for many sports, its main assets being its pool and soccer field.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This station is connected to the Youville workshop which is the main workshop of the STM.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There is a ceramic mural called "Le poète de l'univers" made by Georges Lauda, Paul Pannier and Gérard Cordeau, situated high over the Montmorency platform. It was done to honour three poets including Octave Crémazie. The other two are Saint-Denys Garneau and Emile Nelligan.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Jarry
  • Following Station: Sauvé
  • Entrances: 2

STATION RIDERSHIP (2019)

  • Total Entries: 4,403,658
  • Weekday Average: 16,886
  • Saturday Average: 7,052
  • Sunday Average: 5,460

The numbers above are the total sum of entries at the station for the year 2019. Transfers between lines and exits from the station are not counted. The weekday and weekend averages are based on the fall 2019 period of Sept 3 to Dec 6, 2019. 


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