The Stations

Cartier

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Champ-de-Mars

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Côte-Vertu

Overview

Côte Vertu is the western terminus of the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honor of the Boulevard de la Côte-Vertu.

The station has 3 entrances: 1515 Édouard-Laurin Boulevard, 1510 Boulevard de la Côte-Vertu and 1515 Boulevard de la Côte-Vertu. They are all attractive, in shades of brown with parts of all in diagonal shapes. The mezzanine keeps the same tone of brown with beautiful brown bricks, but the shapes of its walls are more circular. The platforms are beautiful, with the same brown bricks which gives a classic look, yet what is sometimes problematic is that it wasn't planned as a permanent terminus so the space is limited and it can take a long time to empty the platform when there are lots of passengers exiting a train in rush hour.

Points of interest include Les Galeries Norgate (a strip mall), as well as Vanier College and Cegep de Saint-Laurent.


Unique Features

This station is one of the few which has its own city bus terminal, serving both STM (Montreal) and STL (Laval).

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: November 3, 1986
  • Line: 2
  • Following Station: Du Collège
  • Entrances: 3

Public Artwork

The overpass has stainless-steel murals by Yves Trudeau. They were originally supposed to continue on the walls of the stairwell, but the project was never completed.

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Côte-Sainte-Catherine

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Villa-Maria

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Vendôme

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Square-Victoria - OACI

Overview

Square-Victoria-OACI is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro. It was briefly the Western terminus of the line for 1 week, from its opening to the opening of Bonaventure station.

It was originally named just Square-Victoria, in honour of Victoria Square, which is a famous town square in Montreal. In 2014, this station became one of the many who had its name modified after the STM added OACI as the International Civil Aviation Organization (whose french acronym is OACI) has its headquarters in proximity of the station.

The station has 4 entrances: 605 Belmont, 601 Viger, 601 Saint-Antoine West and 605 Saint-Jacques West. The most famous of them is the one one Saint-Antoine which replicates the entry of many stations of the Paris Metro made by Hector Guimard. There are stairs leading below ground from the sidewalk, and around them are green fencing and on top of it is a sign in green and yellow with the word "METROPOLITAIN", and it was a gift from RATP, the Paris equivalent of the STM. The Belmont entry is also original as although it leads to the station, it does so via a long tunnel.

The concourse is quite large, yet doesn't really stand out. The side platforms have beautiful bricks of different colors, from brown to white.


Unique Features

The Guimard entrance as it is the only direct link to the Paris Metro on the Montreal Metro. It is also part of Montreal Underground.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: February 6, 1967
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Bonaventure
  • Following Station: Place d'Armes
  • Entrances: 4

Public Artwork

Again, the Guimard entrance belongs here. Guimard is one of the most famous artists in the "Art Nouveau" style, and having one of his works in the network is prestigious.

There is also a mural by Jean-Paul Mousseau (who also did work at Peel station) at the Belmont entrance. It consists of yellow and green stripes with orange triangles inside them.


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Snowdon

Overview

Snowdon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honor of the Snowdon neighbourhood, which also happens to host three more stations (Côté Sainte-Catherine, Côte-des-Neiges and Villa-Maria).

The station has only one entrance, on 5111 Queen-Mary Road. It has a beautiful design, and it is part of an office building of the STM. Having four storeys, the two higher levels are longer than the second level, who is longer than the first. That means you walk under the higher levels to enter the station. Once in, there are quick stairs that lead to the ticket booth and turnstiles, followed by escalators who give an awesome view of the lights suspended from the ceiling who are put on circles that do a nice pattern.

Once you are at the bottom of the stairs, you reach the central tunnel, as the station was built in three tunnels, the central one for the passengers to walk to their destinations and go up and down the different platforms, while the two other tunnels are the tracks and platforms. The tunnels are connected to each other via cross-tunnels.

The upper level has the terminus platform of the Blue line, called the Snowdon platform, and on the other side is the Côte Vertu platform on the Orange line. On both sides, train doors open on the left. On the lower levels, trains go in the opposite direction and doors open on the right.

The colors of the station are mainly in tones of brown.

The main point of interest is Saint Joseph's Oratory, which is approximately mid-way between Snowdon and Côte-des-Neiges stations. There is also the Décarie autoroute which passes just next to the Snowdon station.


Unique Features

While this section is usually one of the hardest to fill on most stations, this one won't be hard to fill. First of all, since the platforms are built in individual tunnels, they have unique shapes of half circles. Also, the way the cross-tunnels are built, you can wait for your train in them and get a much grandiose view which is quite unique in the network. Since the upper platform doors open on the left, that is also quite unique.

Another unique feature of the station are the maps that are used in the station are different shapes than the rest of the maps in the network (Snowdon is more square while others are more rectangular). They are put on some cubic boxes with lights inside. Some old school metrophiles enjoyed the fact that it stayed many years with older maps, which included old stations names (like Berri-de-Montigny instead of Berri-UQAM) and still had Henri-Bourassa as terminus of the orange line. Snowdon is also the only station of the network to have been terminus of two lines, as it was the western terminus of the orange line in 1981. Finally, Snowdon is the only terminus station of the network that has stacked platforms.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 7 1981 (Line 2) & January 4 1988 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Côte-Sainte-Catherine (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Villa-Maria (Line 2) & Côte-des-Neiges (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

The station's main artwork are wall murals by Claude Guité, which are situated on the walls that passengers look at while waiting for their train (the wall behind which trains passed by). Those murals represent each season, and they are spring (Montmorency platform), summer (Saint-Michel), autumn (Snowdon) and winter (Côté Vertu).

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Sauvé

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Sherbrooke

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Rosemont

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Place-d'Armes

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Plamondon

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Place-Saint-Henri

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Namur

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Montmorency

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Mont-Royal

Overview

Mont-Royal is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Mount Royal Avenue, whose french name is "Mont-Royal'.

The station has a unique entrance, on 470 Mount Royal East. The mezzanine is nice, and can be similar to the ones at Beaudry and Berri-UQAM where you get the doors in the middle with windows all around and over it. Once inside, you find the escalators and stairs who are quite dark compared to other stations. Then the only ticket booth is placed just before the stairs that lead to the side platforms, which are all in beautiful brown bricks, from the walls to the benches to the floors.

Places of interest include famous Montreal theatre "Théâtre du Rideau-Vert, as well as commercial street Mount Royal Avenue.


Unique Features

All of the station was built in a tunnel except for the ticket booth.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Sherbrooke
  • Following Station: Laurier
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

A poem by Gérald Godin, "Tango de Montréal", was put on the wall of the station by a group called "Les industries perdues".


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Lucien-L'Allier

Overview

Lucien L'Allier is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honor of rue Lucien L'Allier, which was named in honor of Lucien L'Allier, an engineer who was a former chairman of the Montreal Transit Commission (which today is the STM) and built the metro. Prior to his death, the planned name for the station was Aqueduc.

The station has only one entrance, on 955 Lucien L'Allier street. It is a beautiful square building in brown bricks with some windows. As soon as you enter, you can see the brown bricks are a pattern of this station, and will be there everywhere. The concourse looks very big with a high ceiling that gives a grandiose impression to the station. Again, all the walls are covered in brown bricks with the exception of a firewall made in glass.

Once you reach the platforms, which are among the deepest in the network, the impression is of a much smaller space. Even the benches are made in brown bricks, yet a different pattern.

The biggest point of interest is the Bell Centre. It is home of the Montreal Canadiens but also the place where world renown artists come to do their shows while in Montreal. In addition, combat sports like wrestling, boxing and MMA also do shows there. To accommodate the many spectators who use the subway to attend the Bell Centre, the station was modified to include direct access to the building.

Another place of interest is the E-Commerce Place, which is an office tower for many electronic commerce firms, most notably CGI.


Unique Features

It is one of the few stations that connect to the exo commuter trains.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Georges-Vanier
  • Following Station: Bonaventure
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

There is a sculptural grille by Jean-Jacques Besner that covers the ventilation shaft in the entrance. It was based on old aqueducts as the original name of the station was supposed to be Aqueduc.


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Lionel-Groulx

Overview

Lionel-Groulx is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Green and Orange lines.

This station was initially going to be called Albert but following the death of Lionel Groulx, who was a Roman Catholic priest, his name was given to the station before it opened.In recent years, there has been demands to change the Lionel-Groulx name because of antisemitism comments he made.Jazz pianist Oscar Peterson has been suggested as a possible replacement because he grew up in this area.

Like most transfer stations, it has two level of platforms, however what is great with Lionel-Groulx is the way it is made, you can see all four trains at the same time from the top level as if you look around the escalators, you can see the lower platform and since the lower level trains are closer to the centre as the upper level trains (the upper level platform goes over the lower level trains), they are easy to see.Also, if you stand at the right side of the platform on the upper level, you can see trains move up the hill as they arrive, which is the only station where you can see the tires of the train you are going to board as it arrives.You can also see the train at the lower level leave by being at the same spot.

It is one of the stations where the architecture is most worth seeing.With its orange floors as well as granite walls and ceiling, it is truly a classic.It gives you an impression you are not in a subway station but in a large complex where the subway just happens to enter.

The main destination around the station is the Atwater Market.

There is only one entrance, 620 Atwater Street.

The station has two central platforms, although technically each line has stacked platforms as it is made to facilitate transfers, so that passengers can switch lines without taking the stairs.Passengers going downtown can switch on the lower platform and those going to the Western parts of the lines can switch on the upper platform.Transfers between Green and Orange lines (even through the stairs) are also quicker to do here than at Berri-UQAM due to the station layout, and some passengers can actually save time by going an extra station to do their transfer here (For example, someone from the northeast part of the Orange line going to Atwater will get there quicker switching at Lionel-Groulx than Berri).Lionel-Groulx is also better arranged than Snowdon for the moment as the majority of passengers transferring at Snowdon need to take the stairs, as Snowdon was built assuming that line 5 would be expanded to the West, which never happened.

Lionel-Groulx was built as a transfer station from the start, yet it opened on the Green line first, on September 3 1978, as opposed to April 28 1980 for Orange line.

There is a Couche-Tard convenience store and a Cafe Depot coffee shop, and a souvenir shop selling various accessories on the upper platform, as well as a Van Houte coffee shop anda Tabatout convenience store on the lower one.


Unique Features

This is one of only 5 stations to have a different layout than side platforms.Also, the trains on the lower platform open their doors on the left.

The station was featured (along Radisson) in the movie "The Jackal", where Lionel-Groulx was arranged to pass for the Metro Center station in Washington, D.C.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978 (Line 1) & April 28, 1980 (Line 2)
  • Line: 1 & 2
  • Previous Station: Charlevoix (Line 1) & Place-Saint-Henri (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Atwater (Line 1) & Georges-Vanier (Line 2)
  • Entrances: 1

Public Artwork

The artwork of the station is a wood sculpture called "The Tree of Life", by Italian sculptor Joseph Rifesser.It is on the mezzanine level and represents 5 different faces from the 5 continents, and also a pair of stainless steel mural sculptures by station architect Yves Roy, also on the mezzanine level, which can also be seen on the higher platform.


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Jarry

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Georges-Vanier

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Du Collège

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De la Savane

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De la Concorde

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Beaubien

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Berri-UQAM

Overview

Berri-UQAM is the main transfer station of the Montreal Metro, serving all three of the original lines (Green, Orange, Yellow).

The station was originally called Berri-de-Montigny as it was at the corner of Berri and de Montigny streets. However, since the name of de Montigny street changed to de Maisonneuve soon after the opening, the station was going to change its name to Berri-de-Maisonneuve, but since Expo 67 was just about to happen, it was decided to keep the original name in order not to confuse visitors. However, on January 1, 1988, as the Université-de-Montréal station was about to get inaugurated, all major universities who didn't have their name integrated with the station leading to its campuses had them added. Guy station added Concordia to become Guy-Concordia, and Berri-de-Montigny became Berri-UQAM. The name is still in effect today, but many people who used the station before the name change still refer to the station as Berri-de-Montigny.

This station has three levels of platform, and the higher the platform, the vaster it feels, with the Orange line being on top and feeling like the building we are in is of infinite proportions, then under it, there is the Green line which still feels vast compared to other stations but not as much as the Orange line platform, and then Yellow line is the deepest and most intimate.

The inside of the station is grandiose in the sense that it is so big. You can feel this as soon as you enter from the vast entrance on Berri & Sainte-Catherine, even from the outside as it is grandiose with its height and the many windows that are around it. Then, when you reach the concourse, you can see that, in order to accommodate passengers moving, there is a lot of empty space (with the exception of a granite bench), which helps make it look even bigger. There are many escalators to go between the different platforms. Parts of the platforms of the Orange have a view of the stairs going down toward the Green line. Those are the seats in front of the window with orange decals on them.

The volume of the station is very large on the main floor when you enter the station. There are a few stores, the main one was during many years the library "Le Parchemin", which has recently been replaced by an UQAM library. There is also the customer service centre of the STM as well as a few convenience stores located around the station.

There are several points of interest around the station, including Gare d'Autocars de Montréal, which is the intercity bus terminal, the UQAM University, Place Dupuis shopping centre, l'Hôtel des Gouverneurs, Place Emilie-Gamelin square, Theatre St-Denis and M Telus (formerly known as Metropolis) performing Arts centre.

The station has five entrances: 1500 Berri, 505 Sainte-Catherine East, 850 de Maisonneuve East, 1470 Saint-Denis and 1621 Berri.

In addition to metro transfers, passengers can transfer to intercity buses and the 747 STM bus route among others.


Unique Features

This station, which was where the metro inauguration took place, is the biggest of the network, the only one having 3 lines.

As there isn't a lot of space in the tail tracks behind the yellow line terminus, it is common to see trains on the yellow line switch tracks by going back in reverse from the terminus platform and then coming back in to get passengers by arriving to the platforms in Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke direction in the same way it usually arrives via Jean-Drapeau station.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Lines: 1 & 2 & 4
  • Previous Station: Saint-Laurent (Line 1) & Champ-de-Mars (Line 2).
  • Following Station: Beaudry (Line 1), Sherbrooke (Line 2) & Jean Drapeau (Line 4)
  • Entrances: 5

Public Artwork

The main art attraction in the station is the glass mural over the tunnel leading to Honoré-Beaugrand. It was made by Pierre Gaboriau and Pierre Osterrath and is called 'Hommage aux fondateurs de la ville de Montréal'. It was installed in 1969 after it was given by the Desjardins Group (Caisses Populaires Desjardins). The other main price of arts are paintings by Robert Lapalme, that are over the stairs leading to the Yellow Line.


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Bonaventure

Overview

Bonaventure is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro, and its original Western terminus from its opening in 1966 until the extension that made several stations rotate as terminus, from Place Saint-Henri in 1980 to Côte-Vertu, which is the terminus since 1986.

It was named in honor of Place Bonaventure, which is an office complex and hotel.

The station has two official entrances: 1166 de la Gauchetière West, 955 de la Cathédrale. There are four more entrances through Place Bonaventure, Château Champlain, the 1000 de la Gauchetière complex, and the 1250 René-Lévesque West complex.

Due to it being in a busy downtown sector, which also includes the Montreal Central Station which is the terminus of the intercity trains, the entrances are all integrated into buildings. The one just in front of Windsor Station, the former train station that is now transformed into a food complex, is also stairs directly on the sidewalk that reminds us of many American and European stations.

The mezzanine is very vast and grandiose. It has vaults which are beautiful. The lights suspended from the ceiling are also spectacular. Any visitor who arrives in Montreal from the train will have the impression they are still in the train station due to the ancient but classic architecture.

The station has two side platforms that are also beautiful in addition to being quite large, which is practical for the travelers who have luggages. The same style of lights from the mezzanine also are present on the platforms. They bring a nice contrast to the darkness created by the brown color tone of the platforms.

The many point of interest are the Montreal Central Station for trains, the access to Montreal Underground, the Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral, Windsor Station, the Chateau Champlain hotel, the 1000 de la Gauchetière complex, Place Bonaventure and Place Ville-Marie complexes, as well as the headquarters of the STM.


Unique Features

This station is connected to the intercity train station which makes many travellers enter the Montreal Metro through it. The station also connects with commuter rail as well as buses from Longueuil.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: February 13, 1967
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Lucien L'Allier
  • Following Station: Square-Victoria-OACI
  • Entrances: 2 official, 4 unofficial

Public Artwork

The lights (and everything that holds them) are probably the biggest piece of art. The entry via Windsor Station is also beautiful architecture, just like the mezzanine. This station proves that despite not having specific prices of art, it is more than beautiful.


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Henri-Bourassa

Overview

Henri-Bourassa is a part-time eastern terminus of the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Henri-Bourassa boulevard, which is a major boulevard in Montreal, which was named in honour of Henri Bourassa, who made its mark both as a politician and as a newspaper publisher, being the one who founded the newspaper "Le Devoir".

The station has four entrances: 10670 Berri, 575 Henri-Bourassa, 590 Henri-Bourassa, and 10765 Lajeunesse. The station is relatively large, which can be useful for a terminus as it's easier to clear the platforms once everyone exits a train, especially since many of them will then board many different buses of either the STM or STL.

Most of the station is built with motifs of brown bricks that are nice to look at. That section was built in 1966 but in 2007 when the Laval portion was added to the Orange line, a 3rd platform was built, which makes the original side platform in use for trains still using the station as terminus and all trains going in Côté Vertu direction. Trains who go to Montmorency use the new platform that is by itself at the right the Montmorency platform, yet separated by a wall, with trains opening doors on the left side. The new platform is much more modern, with stainless steel and grey color tones.

Points of interest are Parc Ahuntsic (including Gary-Carter baseball stadium) as well as another park, Ile-de-la-Visitation.


Unique Features

This is the only single-line station to have three platforms. Also it is the only station to be a part-time terminus, as when the extension to Laval was made, it was decided that during rush hours, some trains would still use Henri-Bourassa as terminus.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966 (original station) and April 28, 2007 (3rd Platform)
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Sauvé
  • Following Station: Cartier
  • Entrances: 4

Public Artwork

There is a concrete mural made by Jacques Huet called "Réveil de la conscience par la solitude". It combines art with practical as it also serves as a firewall with the opposite building.

Another artwork is called .98 (sometimes refer to as Point 98 in French), and was done by Axel Morgenthaler. It consists of 98 LEDs on stainless steel, which together are forming the shape of a trapezoid. Situated in the corridor between the terminal platforms and the one for Montmorency, those lights consist of the three primary colors and therefore can create basically any color and evolve all over the day.


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Crémazie

Overview

Crémazie is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Boulevard Crémazie, a frontage road parallel to Autoroute 40. The boulevard was named in honour of French Canadian poet and bookseller Octave Crémazie.

The station has two entrances. The main one is the northern entrance. Originally the mezzanine was quite small, it had a square shape and was just as high as the doors. The front of the roof was sky blue, which was appropriate as it matched the color of the metro cars. In 1992, the FTQ built its headquarters there and the entrance of the subway was integrated in the new building. The pale colors of the new building matches well with the pale beige colors of the inside of the station. The entrance is covered by the floor over it, which is great for passengers wanting to wait for the bus on a rainy day. As a bonus, there is also a mailbox right next to it so you can drop off your mail before taking the subway. The southern entrance is inside another building but the only thing there is some stairs that lead to an underground corridor that goes under Crémazie boulevard to reach the north side.

The northern entrance has two sets of stairs, on the left are the escalators and on the right the regular stairs. Once you reach the bottom of the stairs, you have the ticket booth on the right and the turnstiles in front. The walls and floor are all beige motifs. Then you take another escalator and while on it you will see how grandiose the station, situated at its right, looks. The lighting is wonderfully done with the ceiling having many squares and some of them being illuminated.

You can reach the Côte-Vertu platform by taking the stairs just next to the escalators or go on the overpass to reach the Montmorency platform.

Points of interest include the FTQ complex, as well as Collège André-Grasset who are quite close to the station. Then if you go through St-Hubert street in the northern direction you can find Collège Ahuntsic and Complexe sportif Claude-Robillard, which is recognized as a training facility for many sports, its main assets being it's pool and soccer field.


Unique Features

This station is connected to the Youville workshop which is the main workshop of the STM.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Jarry
  • Following Station: Sauvé
  • Entrances: 2

Public Artwork

There is a ceramic mural called "Le poète de l'univers" made by Georges Lauda, Paul Pannier and Gérard Cordeau, situated high over the Montmorency platform. It was done to honour three poets including Octave Crémazie. The other two are Saint-Denys Garneau and Emile Nelligan.


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Jean-Talon

Overview

Jean-Talon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of Jean-Talon street, which was named in honour of Jean Talon, who was intendant of New France.

The station has four entrances, 7100 Berri, 430 Jean-Talon East, 522 Jean-Talon East, and a fully automated entrance on 780 Jean-Talon East. The entrances are all nice and attractive, each being indépendant looking than the others. Having been built in different eras, they constitute a good mix of materials and colors, and each one has its own charm.

The Orange line was originally the only one at this station, and its side platforms are the highest. Their design is relatively modest, with the majority of the walls and floor being in tones of grey. The floor around the sections which lead to the Blue line are orange as a way of showing those who arrive that this is the Orange line platform. Since the Blue line service ends earlier, there are grills that can be closed when it's not in service.

In order to link the Orange line and Blue line platforms, large volumes were built on both sides of the station. They are beautiful, with orange and blue flooring and greyish walls. Directional panels are suspended from the ceiling, and are also in orange and blue, with their look similar to those at Snowdon, although there they are installed on the walls instead of from the ceiling. Also on these volumes you can see some chazy limestone, which is the rock from which the station was built.

In order not to close the Orange line when the Blue line was built, the Blue line was built with stacked platforms. The Snowdon platform is the upper one. Trains on this platform have doors opening on the left. The highlight of this platform is a wall mural by Judith Bricault Klein that represents the transfer between the two lines. The Saint-Michel platform is lower and despite having a blue floor and blue seats (like the Snowdon platform), the walls are more in tones of grey and brown.

Points of interest include Plaza Saint-Hubert, which is a group of stores and restaurants grouped together, and also Jean-Talon market, Little Italy, as well as Tour Jean-Talon, which is an office tower from which an entry of the station is integrated.


Unique Features

One unique feature is the stacked platforms on the Blue line which also result in trains on Snowdon platforms having doors open on the left. It is also the only station in the network that was built as a single-line station and was changed into a transfer station.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966 (Line 2) & June 16, 1986 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Beaubien (Line 2) & de Castelnau (Line 5)
  • Following Station: Jarry (Line 2) & Fabre (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 4

Public Artwork

One of the most beautiful artwork in all the network is Judith Bricault Klein's enamelled steel mural of 256 panels. Another great piece of art is Gilbert Sauvé's mural on both of the Blue line platforms, which are blue arrows combined with orange circles on concrete which indicate the direction the trains are going.

Platform Photos


Interior Photos


Exterior Photos


Laurier

Overview

Laurier is a station on the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Laurier avenue, which got its name from former Canadian Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier.

There are two entrances, at 5113 Rivard and 495 Gilford. While neither stands out from the outside, the one on Rivard street is special inside because it has automatic entry doors. This is one of only four stations in the network that have this feature and the only one not on the Blue line. The one on Gilford, however, has the utility of having way more space so people can wait for buses inside, which is handy in the winter when you wait for certain bus routes that pass less frequently.

The side platforms are elegant with their granite wall but what lacks on them is that exits are only at the extremities and each one leads to a different entrance, which means passengers who are not aware may have to walk all over backwards to exit at their preferred spot.

The ceilings are quite low due to the station being built in a tunnel like it's neighbour Mont-Royal.

Places of interest include Ecole nationale de théâtre, and Ecole supérieure de la danse au Québec.


Unique Features

Laurier station platforms couldn't be described without mentioning the spots on the walls over the benches, which are the results of oil on people's hair getting in the granite.

Station Map



Station Facts 

  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Mont-Royal
  • Following Station: Rosemont
  • Entrances: 2

Public Artwork

This station does not have any artwork. The granite walls on the platforms may be the only thing that is worth looking at there.


Platform Photos


Interior Photos


Exterior Photos