The Stations

Vendôme

Vendôme is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after the nearby avenue de Vendôme. This station is one of the few on the metro that connects with the exo commuter trains. 

This station's primary roles are to serve the adjacent McGill University Health Centre, as well as the exo commuter train lines to Vaudreuil-Hudson, Saint-Jérôme and Candiac, in addition to serving the region's residents.

The station has three entrances. One is the original entrance building, the second is a new entrance that was opened in 2021, which provides accessible access to the station, and a third entrance via the underground tunnel between the station, exo and the hospital.

The original entrance is made up of concrete, metal vent grills and curved windows. The new entrance is entirely made up of glass windows and is large, bright and very inviting. This entrance was created as the original entrance would have been too complex to integrate elevators to render it accessible. From either entrance, you can the platforms, however, both have their own mezzanine and fare gates. Access to the exo trains can also be reached from within the station.

Once inside, the platforms can be accessed by stairs or elevators (depending on the entrance). The platform area features a beautiful stained glass window with a stainless steel sculpture suspended above the tracks. Rounded red rectangular light strips run from one end of the platform to the other and provide a unique look to the station. Hexagonal floor tiles and bare concrete walls, along with red benches make up the rest of the look of the platforms. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

Unique features of this station include its connection to the exo commuter trains, being one of only a select few that offer this intermodal connection. The length between Vendôme and Place-Saint-Henri is also the longest distance between two stations on the island of Montreal. The same segment of track between the two stations also features several hard curves back and forth creating one of the more exciting portions of track to ride on the network.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main art installation is a beautiful stained-glass window and stainless-steel sculpture that can be viewed from the far end of the mezzanine and the platforms. It was created by Marcelle Ferron, and scatters changing colours of light into the station. The STM shared that the sculpture was originally intended to create sounds from the wind created by the passing metro trains through the station.

A second artwork was installed in 2021 as part of the new secondary entrance. It is a blue mosaic located at the top of the stairs of the entrance, which was created by Patrick Bernatchez.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7, 1981
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Villa-Maria
  • Following Station: Place-Saint-Henri
  • Entrances: 3

Lionel-Groulx

Lionel-Groulx is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Green and Orange lines.

This station was initially going to be called Albert but following the death of Lionel Groulx, who was a Roman Catholic priest, his name was given to the station before it opened. In recent years, there have been demands to change the Lionel-Groulx name because of antisemitism comments he made. Jazz pianist Oscar Peterson has been suggested as a possible replacement because he grew up in this area.

Like most transfer stations, it has two levels of platforms, however, what is great with Lionel-Groulx is the way it is made, you can see all four trains at the same time from the top level as if you look around the escalators, you can see the lower platform and since the lower level trains are closer to the centre as the upper-level trains (the upper-level platform goes over the lower level trains), they are easy to see. Also, if you stand on the right side of the platform on the upper level, you can see trains move up the hill as they arrive, which is the only station where you can see the tires of the train you are going to board as it arrives. You can also see the train at the lower level departing by being at the same spot.

It is one of the stations where the architecture is most worth seeing. With its orange floors as well as granite walls and ceiling, it is truly a classic. It gives you an impression you are not in a subway station but in a large complex where the subway just happens to enter.

The main destination around the station is the Atwater Market. There is only one entrance, 620 Atwater Street.

The station has two central platforms, although technically each line has stacked platforms as it is made to facilitate transfers so that passengers can switch lines without taking the stairs. Passengers going downtown can switch on the lower platform and those going to the Western parts of the lines can switch on the upper platform. Transfers between Green and Orange lines (even though the stairs) are also quicker to do here than at Berri-UQAM due to the station layout, and some passengers can actually save time by going to an extra station to do their transfer here (For example, someone from the northeast part of the Orange line going to Atwater will get there quicker switching at Lionel-Groulx than Berri). Lionel-Groulx is also better arranged than Snowdon for the moment as the majority of passengers transferring at Snowdon need to take the stairs, as Snowdon was built assuming that line 5 would be expanded to the West, which never happened.

Lionel-Groulx was built as a transfer station from the start, yet it opened on the Green line first, on September 3, 1978, as opposed to April 28 1980 for the Orange line.

There is a Couche-Tard convenience store and a Cafe Depot coffee shop, and a souvenir shop selling various accessories on the upper platform, as well as a Van Houtte coffee shop and Tabatout convenience store on the lower one.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is one of only 5 stations to have a different layout than side platforms. Also, the trains on the lower platform open their doors on the left.

The station was featured (along with Radisson) in the movie "The Jackal", where Lionel-Groulx was arranged to pass for the Metro Center station in Washington, D.C.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The artwork of the station is a wood sculpture called "The Tree of Life", by Italian sculptor Joseph Rifesser. It is on the mezzanine level and represents 5 different faces from the 5 continents, and also a pair of stainless steel mural sculptures by station architect Yves Roy, is also on the mezzanine level, which can also be seen on the higher platform.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978 (Line 1) & April 28, 1980 (Line 2)
  • Line: 1 & 2
  • Previous Station: Charlevoix (Line 1) & Place-Saint-Henri (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Atwater (Line 1) & Georges-Vanier (Line 2)
  • Entrances: 1

Charlevoix

UNIQUE FEATURES

PUBLIC ARTWORK

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Lasalle
  • Following Station: Lionel-Groulx
  • Entrances: 1

Lasalle

UNIQUE FEATURES

PUBLIC ARTWORK

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: De L'Église
  • Following Station: Charlevoix
  • Entrances: 1

Villa-Maria

Villa-Maria is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name originates from the nearby Villa Maria school.

The station has one entrance, which is of a decent size and is contained by a bus loop that wraps around the station. Heading down to the mezzanine level, there is a large convenience store located just before the fare gates. This is also the first spot to see the station's signature yellow, two-tone orange and red stripes, which feature prominently throughout.

After passing through the fare gates, more escalators and stairs are found around the corner, which leads to the mid-level before the platforms. This area is bathed in natural sunlight, which is allowed inside by means of a large light shaft found above the escalators. Large colourful notched circles rest on stainless steel pegs sticking out from the wall. Stairs on both sides of the mid-level give access to each of the platforms. Above the tunnelled portion of the station, there are large orange vent ducts, made in the same colour as the rest of the decor to nicely blend in. The signature coloured stripes can be found all along the platform floors, with matching seating protruding from the walls. It is a very nice visual cue that quickly identifies the station to travellers without needing signage.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The signature look of the station created by the yellow, two-tone orange and red stripes on the floors and seating gives Villa-Maria station a very recognizable visual identity.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is "Circles" created by André Léonard. There are two murals each consisting of five dial-shaped polymer concrete disks, each resting on a stainless-steel peg. Each disc is rotated 45 degrees from its neighbour, which creates a feeling of movement and directionality.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7, 1981
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Snowdon
  • Following Station: Vendôme
  • Entrances: 1

Viau

Viau is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro. 

It received its name from Rue Viau, located nearby, which was named for Charles-Théodore Viau, who purchased and developed the land into the Viauville neighbourhood. The station is located at the eastern end of the Olympic Park in Montreal. It is quite a popular station due to the many tourist attractions located in close proximity, which include the Olympic Stadium and Tower, the Montreal Biodome, the Montreal Planetarium, the Stade Saputo soccer stadium, and a movie theatre, among others.

The mezzanine level is quite spacious allowing for the easy flow of passengers into and out of the station and features a convenience store near the entrances. The station is relatively shallow in depth with the tracks and platforms located only one flight of stairs below the mezzanine level. It is a bright station with lots of windows and several skylights, some of which bring natural light into the lower platform area. The platform level is accessed via stairs and elevators at the eastern end of the station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station's simple layout combined with the abundant natural light entering the mezzanine and the light shaft for the platforms makes it a cheerful station to visit. When exiting, passengers are treated to fantastic side profile views of the Olympic Stadium's Tower in the near distance. All the attractions are within short walking distance due to the station's strategic location.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main public artwork at Viau station is on the eastern wall of the mezzanine level. It is a ceramic mural, entitled Opus 74, which was created by artist Jean-Paul Mousseau. It is a non-figurative representation of the Montreal Tower at the Olympic Stadium and the Olympic Flame.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Pie-IX
  • Following Station: Assomption
  • Entrances: 1

Verdun

Verdun is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of the Verdun borough, which itself was named in honour of Saverdun, a commune in France, from where Verdun's founder Zacharie Dupuy was originally from.

The station has two entrances, 4525 Verdun and 4520 Verdun. Both entrances are in a black tone and have lots of tinted windows similar to neighbouring station Jolicoeur.

Once you go in, you will take two sets of stairs or escalators to reach the ticket barriers. While on the first stairs, you will get to see grey walls with purple and orange motif lines which look nice. The second one has yellow barriers on the right which also look nice and match the bars that hold the lights suspended from the walls. At the bottom of those stairs, you reach the concourse where the walls are a lighter grey and the same style of lines as upstairs are recreated but this time in purple and gold. Looks good again. You then have the ticket barriers and when you pass through, you reach what could be qualified as a balcony as it gives access directly to the track and platforms, which is ideal for train spotting. Stairs will lead you to both platforms who have the same matching lines as in most of the station, again purple and gold. The floors are made of white tiles.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station has a forced perspective over the platforms and tracks as the ceiling is lower on the Western side of the station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Antoine Lamarche created 'Bas-reliefs', which are lines on the upper part of the concrete walls of the station. Since the lines are in all kinds of directions, it creates an original pattern, on which yellow bars can be seen holding out the lights, creating a nice overall result.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Jolicoeur
  • Following Station: De l'Église 
  • Entrances: 2

Université-de-Montréal

Université de Montréal is a station on the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of the university of the same name, under which the station is located. This is a major university that also includes Polytechnique Montreal and HEC Montreal.

This station has three entrances: 2830 Édouard-Montpetit, 5400 Louis-Colin and 2810 Édouard-Montpetit. The one on 2830 Édouard-Montpetit, which is the main one, is one of the most beautiful entrances of the network, being integrated into a mountain. The front consists mostly of windows, which are beautiful in daylight and magic at night with the impact of the indoor lights.

The inside of the station is done in beautiful brown bricks, which are everywhere inside. The turnstiles area is also very attractive as it has some natural light from the exterior.

The platforms are quite sombre with only the brown bricks on the walls, yet it is far from boring to look at as not only are they beautiful, the architecture of the station is made so beautifully, from the stairs to the overpass to the ceiling, that this station is always fun to be at.

In addition to the University, another point of interest is the Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine, one of the biggest pediatric hospitals in North America.

UNIQUE FEATURES

If you enter through the Louis-Colin entrance, you will reach the station through a corridor over the platforms, which is unique in the network.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

André Léonard made two murals made of terra-cotta blocks. The main one, over the tracks and platforms, represents the four classic elements of the universe (air, water, fire, and earth). The other one is in the Louis-Colin corridor and it consists of arrows pointing to the exit.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Côte-des-Neiges
  • Following Station: Édouard-Montpetit
  • Entrances: 3

Square-Victoria - OACI

Square-Victoria-OACI is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro. It was briefly the Western terminus of the line for 1 week, from its opening to the opening of Bonaventure station.

It was originally named just Square-Victoria, in honour of Victoria Square, which is a famous town square in Montreal. In 2014, this station became one of the many that had its name modified after the STM added OACI as the International Civil Aviation Organization (whose French acronym is OACI) has its headquarters in the proximity of the station.

The station has 4 entrances: 605 Belmont, 601 Viger, 601 Saint-Antoine West and 605 Saint-Jacques West. The most famous of them is the one one Saint-Antoine which replicates the entry of many stations of the Paris Metro made by Hector Guimard. There are stairs leading below ground from the sidewalk, and around them are green fencing and on top of it is a sign in green and yellow with the word "METROPOLITAIN", and it was a gift from RATP, the Paris equivalent of the STM. The Belmont entry is also original as although it leads to the station, it does so via a long tunnel.

The concourse is quite large, yet doesn't really stand out. The side platforms have beautiful bricks of different colours, from brown to white.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The Guimard entrance as it is the only direct link to the Paris Metro on the Montreal Metro. It is also part of Montreal Underground.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Again, the Guimard entrance belongs here. Guimard is one of the most famous artists in the "Art Nouveau" style, and having one of his works in the network is very prestigious.

There is also a mural by Jean-Paul Mousseau (who also did work at Peel station) at the Belmont entrance. It consists of yellow and green stripes with orange triangles inside them.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: February 6, 1967
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Bonaventure
  • Following Station: Place-d'Armes
  • Entrances: 4

Snowdon

Snowdon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of the Snowdon neighbourhood, which also happens to host three more stations (Côté Sainte-Catherine, Côte-des-Neiges and Villa-Maria).

The station has only one entrance, on 5111 Queen-Mary Road. It has a beautiful design, and it is part of an office building of the STM. Having four storeys, the two higher levels are longer than the second level, who is longer than the first. That means you walk under the higher levels to enter the station. Once in, there are quick stairs that lead to the ticket booth and turnstiles, followed by escalators that give an awesome view of the lights suspended from the ceiling that are put on circles that do a nice pattern.

Once you are at the bottom of the stairs, you reach the central tunnel, as the station was built in three tunnels, the central one for the passengers to walk to their destinations and go up and down the different platforms, while the two other tunnels are the tracks and platforms. The tunnels are connected to each other via cross-tunnels.

The upper level has the terminus platform of the Blue line, called the Snowdon platform, and on the other side is the Côte Vertu platform on the Orange line. On both sides, train doors open on the left. On the lower levels, trains go in the opposite direction and doors open on the right.

The colours of the station are mainly tones of brown.

The main point of interest is Saint Joseph's Oratory, which is approximately mid-way between Snowdon and Côte-des-Neiges stations. There is also the Décarie autoroute which passes just next to the Snowdon station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

While this section is usually one of the hardest to fill on most stations, this one won't be hard to fill. First of all, since the platforms are built in individual tunnels, they have unique shapes of half circles. Also, the way the cross-tunnels are built, you can wait for your train in them and get a much grandiose view which is quite unique in the network. Since the upper platform doors open on the left, that is also quite unique.

Another unique feature of the station is the maps that are used in the station are different shapes than the rest of the maps in the network (Snowdon is more square while others are more rectangular). They are put on some cubic boxes with lights inside. Some old school metrophiles enjoyed the fact that it stayed many years with older maps, which included old station names (like Berri-de-Montigny instead of Berri-UQAM) and still had Henri-Bourassa as the terminus of the orange line. Snowdon is also the only station of the network to have been the terminus of two lines, as it was the western terminus of the orange line in 1981. Finally, Snowdon is the only terminus station of the network that has stacked platforms.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The station's main artwork is wall murals by Claude Guité, which are situated on the walls that passengers look at while waiting for their train (the wall behind which trains passed by). Those murals represent each season, and they are spring (Montmorency platform), summer (Saint-Michel), autumn (Snowdon) and winter (Côté Vertu).

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7 1981 (Line 2) & January 4 1988 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Côte-Sainte-Catherine (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Villa-Maria (Line 2) & Côte-des-Neiges (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 1

Sherbrooke

Sherbrooke is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after the nearby rue Sherbrooke, which itself was named after Sir John Coape Sherbrooke, who served as governor-general of British North America from 1816-1818.

This station has two entrances, both integrated into buildings (one of which is an apartment). The station passes underneath rue Berri, with entrances located on both sides of the street. The entrances themselves are rather plain and lead down to the mezzanine, one level below. 

Once at the mezzanine, the ceiling turns into a nice purple grill, covering the lights found within. There is some retail located on the mezzanine level.

Heading down to the platforms, the ceiling changes to become a light beige colour along with the tiles on the walls. Purple accent strips are scattered along the platforms reaching from floor to ceiling. There are also black marble or granite columns in the central area, which is quite large and wide.

The seating along the platforms is provided by purple chairs, that partially resemble the seats on the older MR-73 metro trains in shape and size.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The prominent use of the colour purple in the station, from the ceiling grill on the mezzanine to the purple stripes along the platforms and the purple seating, gives Sherbrooke station a signature theme and colour to call its own.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There are several artworks in Sherbrooke station. The first is entitled "Horizons" by Mario Mercola, which is a circular mural in orange porphyry, helping to brighten the exit leading to the Place du Cercle tower. The second is entitled "Mosaic" by Gabriel Bastien & Andrea Vau and is a Venetian marble depicting the founding banquet of the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste. The third art piece entitled "Rivières", once again by Mario Merola, is a mural done in brick and is a rhythmic pattern of brown bricks.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Berri-UQAM
  • Following Station: Mont-Royal
  • Entrances: 2

Sauvé

Sauvé is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name originates from the street on which the station is found, rue Sauvé, which itself was named after a landowner who once had a property that the street crossed. Located just south of the station is the exo Sauvé commuter train station that serves the Mascouche line.

The station has two entrances, one on either side of rue Sauvé. The entrances themselves are quite small and directly lead to the escalators and stairs to descend to the mezzanine level. 

The ticket booth and fare gates are placed in a relatively small area (as compared to most other stations). From there, it is quite direct to reach the mid-level above the platforms. An overhead walkway to cross to the opposite platforms is open on the sides, permitting visibility of the trains passing through underneath. Narrow stairwells on both sides of each access lead to the platforms and are covered with inch-sized brown and beige tiles. 

The platform level is entirely in a tunnelled section of the station, and as a result, the ceiling takes the shape of a tunnel and is relatively low in height. Recessed seating is present in a few places, with the seats being coloured brown.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station itself is quite plain but is still worth seeing due to how much infrastructure was placed in such a small space. It also makes for an interesting train-spotting location, due to the overhead walkway above the tracks.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Crémazie
  • Following Station: Henri-Bourassa
  • Entrances: 2

Saint-Michel

Saint-Michel is the eastern terminus of the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Boulevard Saint-Michel, which itself was named in honour of the Saint-Michel neighbourhood in which both the boulevard and station are located.

The station has two entrances, 7270 Saint-Michel and 7325 Saint-Michel. Both entrances are showing signs of the station, which are a mix of brown bricks with glass bricks. When you enter through the Eastern one (7325), you need to take the stairs or the escalators and they will lead you right to the turnstiles. No long walk underneath to reach them! Once past the turnstiles, you take another set of stairs or escalators to reach the platforms, but while on them you can admire the brown brick walls which shape the station and which have a mix of straight and curved parts. At the bottom, you will be ready to take the steps that lead to the Snowdon platform, while the overpass where passengers get out is parallel to the escalators. The stairs to reach the platforms are beautifully realized in one of the curvy parts of the station.

The platforms consist again of a mixture of brown bricks and glass bricks on the walls, with the central section of each one being the exception with some lighter gray tones.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is the only station which has platforms of 102 metres instead of 152 like all other stations. To be more specific, this station has room for 6 cars while others have room for 9. This is at the time of writing in 2021 but will most likely be changed soon enough for two reasons. The first one is that the Blue Line will expand to the East in the coming years and therefore it would be logical to extend the station at the same time the line is extended. The second reason is that the Azur trains are not able to split into sets of 3, 6 or 9 cars and therefore, as the plan of the STM is to have Azur trains all over the network when the MR-73 are retired, this will definitely need to be addressed.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

On the platforms, there are glass bricks painted by Marcelin Cardinal, Charles Lemay, Lauréat Marois and Normand Moffat. The glass bricks were used to represent the Saint-Michel neighbourhood, which also uses them.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 16, 1986
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: D'Iberville
  • Entrances: 2

Saint-Laurent

Saint-Laurent is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. The station is named after the nearby Saint-Laurent boulevard in Montreal, which is the reference line for streets being called East or West.

The station is one of the original metro stations that opened in 1966. The overall layout is fairly simple with only one entrance and an easy-to-follow path from there to reach the mezzanine and platforms. Originally, the station was planned to have additional entrances, however to this day, the single entrance remains the only one, despite plans for development around the station surfacing from time to time.

The station is quite plain in its appearance and amenities. The interior consists mostly of various shades of beige, with a few accents in red on the platforms. The station was built cut and cover. As a result, the station is quite cavernous, so much so that it feels quite a bit larger than it needs to be. 

One interesting aspect of the station is the limited number of seats on the platforms. Two sets of seats located one next to the other, and positioned underneath the overhead mezzanine walkway bridge and stairs, are the only seating in the station. As is shown in the photos, this fact creates a somewhat barren look at the platforms, with the dull lighting above and the basic flat colours on the wall tiles.

Still, despite its plain appearance, the station does receive its fair share of passengers, no doubt due to its proximity to Place des Festivals | Quartier des spectacles to the west

UNIQUE FEATURES

There are a few unique points about Saint-Laurent station. The first is despite it being a downtown station, it only has one entrance, which additionally is not integrated into any building, as it is free-standing.

The other is the limited seating at the platforms, and their odd location, being by the stairs, rather than being spread out along the entire length.

PUBLIC ARTWORK 

The walls of the platform level are decorated with coloured ceramic tiles, which feature different patterns and colours, stretching to the ceiling. They were created by ceramicist Claude Vermette.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Place-des-Arts
  • Following Station: Berri-UQAM
  • Entrances: 1

Rosemont

Rosemont is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name originates from the nearby boulevard Rosemont.

The station has only one entrance, which is integrated into the ground floor of a building. Escalators and stairs quickly lead people down to the mezzanine level below. Throughout the station, various shades of red tiling adorn the station and create its unique look.

The mezzanine area is rather large and long and leads directly to the access of the platforms. A large and wide walkway crosses the tracks below to grant access to the opposite platform. 

The ceiling in this area is rather high and is painted black and not illuminated. This creates the impression that you are outdoors in the evening. Nice red tiled columns rise up from the floor and reach the ceiling. The seating areas are recessed into the walls with the signature red tiles at their back. 

All these elements combine to create a very tasteful and pleasant station, that is both easy to navigate and calming to be in.

UNIQUE FEATURES

What makes Rosemont unique is the frequent use of the red shaded tiling, which is present throughout the station. Whether it is found on the wall above the escalators near the entrance, on the walkway and pillars in the mezzanine and platforms, to even on the seating areas, the use of the colour red is an undeniable identifying element of this beautiful station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Laurier
  • Following Station: Beaubien
  • Entrances: 1

Radisson

Radisson is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Radisson street, which was named for explorer Pierre-Esprit Radisson.

The station has two entrances: The northern entrance at 7155 Sherbrooke East and the southern entrance at 7250 Sherbrooke East. The entrance buildings are relatively small and the majority of their surface is covered with windows. The space in which they are is relatively quiet as opposed to other subway entrances, especially the one with the bus stop. Once you enter the northern entrance, it has some stairs that lead to a corridor that will bring you to the concourse, which is just next to the southern entry. A convenience store is situated just before the turnstiles. Once you pass the turnstiles you go through escalators that will bring you to the overpass, and as you go near the bottom of the stairs you can have one of the best views of the tracks that are just in the centre.

The view from the side platforms is magnificent. The benches are red, and if you look up you can see the escalators and the lights, which are suspended from the ceiling in black lamp shades.

The points of interest are Place Versailles mall as well as Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal. Also, the 44 bus will quickly lead you to another mall, Les Galeries d'Anjou.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The view from the overpass is definitely special.

The station was featured (along Lionel-Groulx) in the movie "The Jackal", where the station was arranged to pass for the Capitol Heights station in Washington, D.C., despite the fact that any metrophile would easily recognize that those stations are not similar at all, mainly because Capitol Heights has an island platform, yet the colours and architecture of both stations are still two worlds apart.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

It is ironic that one of the most beautiful stations of the network doesn't have a dedicated specific work of art, yet the architecture of the station, made by Papineau, Gérin-Lajoie, Le Blanc and Edwards, is a work of art in itself.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Langelier
  • Following Station: Honoré-Beaugrand
  • Entrances: 3

Préfontaine

Préfontaine is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. The station received its name due to the fact of being partly underneath parc Raymond-Préfontaine, which is close to rue Préfontaine.

The station has very colourful entrance buildings, located on opposite sides of rue Hochelaga. The entrances have a very geometric shape with lots of angles and corners and are decorated in multiple colours. They feature plenty of glass windows and the Metro arrow logo is also featured as directional aids to the doors.

Once inside, the main mezzanine area is covered by a glass roof, supported by long red steel trusses. The natural light in this area is very abundant, creating a cheerful and welcoming space. After passing through the fare gates, the accesses to the platforms are located on either side and are cleverly marked by more Metro arrow logos. This is also repeated on the platform level to point to the stairs to reach the mezzanine level.

Continuing down to the platforms, they receive natural light in the central section, while the rest is illuminated with artificial light. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique features of Préfontaine are clearly the number of windows and skylights that bring in lots of natural light, the colourful entrances and the interesting use of the Metro arrow logo as a directional aid and cue.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The station itself is a work of art, from the geometric shapes and colours found outside at the entrances to the interior of the mezzanine and beyond. In addition, the way the light casts its rays along the floor and walls throughout the day can be quite stunning and is easily seen by passengers on trains passing through the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Frontenac
  • Following Station: Joliette
  • Entrances: 2

Plamondon

Plamondon is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after nearby avenue Plamondon.

There are two entrances to Plamondon station. The standalone entrance features lots of glass windows and is framed with red accent pieces. Coming down into the station, it quickly becomes apparent that past the mezzanine area, the station has a mirror look to it. To help differentiate visually both sides, one is predominantly coloured blue, while the other is red.

Heading to the platforms, on the red side of the station, you will find stairs leading down on both sides. However, more interesting is the blue side, which has a stunning curved ramp leading down from the mezzanine to the platforms. The ramp extends beyond the stopping point of the train, so departing and arriving trains can easily be observed diving into the tunnel and exiting the station. 

At the halfway point of the platforms, there is a point where the red and blue sections meet with a mirrored circle in the middle. Elsewhere along the platforms, a stainless steel grill covers a ventilation pit, bringing in fresh air.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique feature of the station is certainly the blue side's ramp and arrangement of the track. Arriving and departing trains remain in the station itself slightly longer than in other stations due to the extended length of track around the ramps. The track also dives down and curves which add to the stunning effect created when trains arrive or depart.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 29, 1982
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Namur
  • Following Station: Côte-Sainte-Catherine
  • Entrances: 2 

Place-Saint-Henri

Place-Saint-Henri is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after a street and public square located between rue Saint-Jacques and rue Notre-Dame.

The station has 3 entrances, two of which are located in bus loops, while the third is an open-air entrance (one of only three on the Metro, with Bonaventure and Square-Victoria-OACI being the other two). 

The entrances are bright with lots of windows, allowing plenty of natural light to enter the space. The stairs that lead down to the mezzanine level are showered in even more natural light thanks to skylights positioned above. The framing for the windows casts beautiful shadows that move with the passage of the day, and transform this area into a grand staircase, regardless of whether you are going up or down.

The mezzanine contains the fare gates. Off to the side of this area is a bench with a glassed-in stainless steel structure, which protrudes and opens up to the train platform area below.

Continuing down more escalators to reach the train platforms and the full size and scale of the station quickly becomes apparent. In this area, the ceiling is spectacularly high and tapers down to match up with the tunnelled section at the far end of the station. Florescent lighting is integrated into the ceiling to help highlight this architectural delight. 

The platforms themselves are decorated with various shades of yellow to red tiling on the walls, which starts off as yellow by the stairs and escalators and gradually becomes a dark red in the far distance. Simple wooden benches finish off the look of the platforms by providing a clean look throughout.

UNIQUE FEATURES

There are a few architectural features that add to the uniqueness of Place-Saint-Henri station. The first is the grand staircase by the main entrance, which is both large, open and bright, creating a great first or last impression of the station. The second is the sweeping ceiling of the platforms that tapers down as it moves away from the escalators. The same goes for the coloured wall tiles that darken with increasing distance.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There are three artworks in this station. The first is "Bonheur d'occasion' created by Julien Hébert. A mural of coloured glazed bricks creating the words Bonheur d'occasion is embedded on the mezzanine level and located just after passing through the fare gates. The second is a metal sculpture created by Jacques de Tonnancour, and is six truncated cylinders, made of aluminum, painted steel and stainless steel. It is located at one end of the mezzanine level and hangs through the floor into the platform area. Interestingly, the sculpture was originally planned to rotate by a motor. The third art piece is a copper and wood statue of Jacques Cartier (who discovered the St. Lawrence River), created by Joseph-Arthur Vincent in 1893. The statue had been damaged by the passage of time, and the City of Montreal restored it and then relocated it inside the station for protection from the elements in 2001.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Vendôme
  • Following Station: Lionel-Groulx
  • Entrances: 3

Place-des-Arts

Place-des-Arts is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Place des Arts, the famous performing centre hosting a variety of cultural events including theatre and music, which is also attached to the station.

The station has two side platforms and is beautiful with brick walls in zig-zag forms which are in different shades of grey (including blueish grey) mixed with floors whose colours alternate between light grey and green. Since it is made by the same architects as Atwater (David, Boulva, Clève), it brings the same impression of proximity.

In addition to its namesake, this station is also in proximity to Complexe Desjardins, which includes a shopping mall, a hotel and offices, as well as Edifice Jean-Lesage, which is the headquarter of Hydro-Québec.

There are four official entrances to the station: 1555 Jeanne-Mance, 2020 de Bleury, 1990 de Bleury, and 150 Ontario.

UNIQUE FEATURES

Its zig-zag walls are quite unique. In addition, along with a few stations of the Green Line including McGill and Beaudry, this station appears in the movie "C't'a ton tour, Laura Cadieux."

PUBLIC ARTWORK

This station is home to the first piece of art of the Montreal Metro, which is a painted glass mural by Frederick Back which is called 'Les arts lyriques'.It refers to Montreal's musical history and events. There is also a mosaic made by Saskia Siebrand over the Angrignon tunnel.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: McGill
  • Following Station: Saint-Laurent
  • Entrances: 4

Place-d'Armes

Place-d'Armes is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after nearby Place d'Armes located to the south, a French name for a rallying point for a fort's defenders.

This station is connected to the sprawling Palais des Congress de Montéal. It is also connected to the RESO Underground City network of pathways. Other nearby destinations include the Old Montreal tourist area, Chinatown, Montreal Science Centre, Palais de justice de Montréal, Notre-Dame Basilica, Musée Pointe-à-Callière, Cirque du Soleil, just to name a few.

The station layout is quite simple, with entrances located at both ends. One entrance leads outside near Chinatown, while the other leads directly inside the Palais des congrès de Montréal.

A large and open Mezzanine area runs the length of the ground level of the station. Fare gates are located to the sides, to allow people to pass through the station. A skylight that runs the length of the station helps bring natural light to the mezzanine.

The depth of the station platforms is quite shallow at only 4.6m below ground. As a result, the trip from the mezzanine to the platforms is quick and short, either by stairs or elevators.

At the platform level, they are covered in a combination of yellow walls, concrete and brushed stainless steel panels (notably by the seating areas). Also at the platforms are some small glass exhibit cabinets, typically featuring archeological discoveries.

UNIQUE FEATURES

What makes the station unique is how well it integrates alongside the Palais des congrès building. Its shallow depth and wide open mezzanine area function very well for its use as a transit station as well as a popular gathering point.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork of this station is entitled "Soleil de minuit" and was installed in 2017 on the mezzanine just past the fare gates. It is a combination of various types of glass, steel and epoxy resin, all illuminated by an LED backlight. "On 21 June 2015, the first day of summer and the longest day of the year, the sun rose in Brussels. At the same time, in Montreal, it was almost midnight." The artist used a spectrophotometer to measure the light spectrum of these first rays of the Brussels summer, and designed this series of stained glass windows which reproduce the intense colours of these natural lights.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Square-Victoria-OACI
  • Following Station: Champ-de-Mars
  • Entrances: 2

Pie-IX

Pie-IX is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Pie-IX Boulevard, which got its name from Pope Pie-IX.

The station has two entrances: The western entrance is at 2700 Pie-IX and the eastern entrance is at 2705 Pie-IX. The eastern one is very original as its shape is more circular than square, which can make a parallel with the Olympic Stadium to which the station is attached. As soon as you enter, you can still feel the circular shape, from the ceiling with all its lights installed on a circular pattern through the stairs who are outlined by a circular wall. The western entrance has the form of a square, but it leads to the stadium through a corridor with a more curvy shape.

The concourse is one of the bigger in all the network, in order to accommodate the large crowds of Olympic Stadium, which hosted the 1976 Olympics as well as the Montreal Expos. It is all in shades of brown and the floor has circular shapes. Even its bricks are made in circular shapes. There are many turnstiles, again to accommodate large crowds.

There are two side platforms, again in shades of brown. On the wall of the Angrignon platform, you can see the five Olympic rings that were sculpted in bronze. There also used to be logos of the Expos when they were in existence. Some sections of the platforms are covered with bricks, again in a tone of brown. There are also large grills that can be locked, and they are opened when there are events at the stadium so people can go from the metro to the stadium directly.

Apart from the stadium, the points of interest around the station are Saputo Stadium, which is used for soccer, the Montreal Botanical Garden, the Montreal Biodome, the RIO, which manages the Olympic installations, and finally, Collège de Maisonneuve, which has 7000 pre-university students.

UNIQUE FEATURES

There are a few unique features, from the circular shapes in different places to the vast mezzanine.

Also, it is the only station that has extra tracks just before it in order to park trains that can leave quickly when events end. This is a concept similar to the Mets-Willets Point station in New York. As soon as the Expos' game would end, trains could depart the station heading for downtown.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Jordi Bonet did a large mural in the mezzanine. It is called Citius, Altius, Fortius, and is made in concrete and aluminum. Marcel Raby also did a decorative grill on the wall of the Angrignon platform, around the stairs.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Joliette
  • Following Station: Viau
  • Entrances: 2

Peel

Peel is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

Its name comes from Peel Street, which was named in honour of Sir Robert Peel, who was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

The station has two side platforms. The main colour of this station is white, and the theme of the station are circles. There are many on the walls all over the stations. With many of these circles being bright colours on a white backdrop, this gives the station plenty of light and makes it animated no matter the time of day. The walkway over the track is very low and you can feel the wind made by the trains much more when you walk there than in other stations.

This station sees many passengers use it on a daily basis due to its downtown location and proximity to many shopping malls including Les Cours Mont-Royal, as well as Ogilvy's and Holt & Renfrew stores, as well as Sainte-Catherine and Crescent streets.

There are four official entrances to this station: Peel West (1115 de Maisonneuve), Peel East (1011 de Maisonneuve), Metcalfe Street (1008 de Maisonneuve) and Stanley Street (1465 Stanley). However, it is part of Montreal Underground so it is easy to enter it from a few points of access underground.

UNIQUE FEATURES

As well as being part of Montreal Underground, this station is special because it is the shortest distance between two stations (with McGill). The proximity is so close that when a train stops at McGill, you can hear it from Peel.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Jean-Paul Mousseau did 54 large circles made by Jean-Paul Mousseau throughout the station. Today, 37 remain. They are integrated everywhere, with bright circles next to advertising panels, as well as ceramic circles in one entrance, as well as circular tiles on the floor and walls. Mousseau also did work at 3 other stations: Viau, Honoré-Beaugrand and Square-Victoria-OACI.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Guy-Concordia
  • Following Station: McGill
  • Entrances: 4

Parc

Parc is a station on the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It received its name from Avenue du Parc.

The station has only one entrance, which is at 7245 Hutchison Street, the historical Park Avenue Station for trains of the Canadian Pacific Railway from 1931 to 1984. It is a beautiful building that kept its beauty over the years even after being abandoned between its functions as a train station to the current one as a metro station. It is made in the art deco style and its four pillars in the front give a look like it would be an official residence or host to an important institution.

Once you enter the mezzanine, you quickly realize how vast it is. The ceiling is very high and there is a lot of room for passengers to move which makes it very practical. The escalators and stairs lead to the fare control zone which is more modern. Once you pass the turnstiles, you see a frieze on the wall, which will be a theme all over the station including the platforms. Another nice aspect of the platform is the beauty of the overpass which has barriers that are much higher than other stations, yet it is very practical as it makes it impossible to accidentally fall on the track. Passengers can still look at ongoing trains through the four windows in the shape of circles.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This station is one of the few that are also an Exo commuter rail station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Suspended in the light shaft at the ceiling of the mezzanine is a work of art by Claire Sarrasin named "Métamorphose d'Icare". It is a sculpture that has the shape of a wing and is surrounded by mirrors, which gives the impression that there are multiple wings. It can also look like a flower or a butterfly.

There is also a frieze by Huguette Desjardins that goes throughout the station. Made with triangular folds, it can give the impression of having different colours depending on the angle you look from.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 15, 1987 (Metro) & 1931 (as Park Avenue train station)
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Acadie
  • Following Station:  De Castelnau
  • Entrances: 1

Papineau

Papineau is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from nearby ave. Papineau, which was named for Joseph Papineau, a notary, surveyor, politician and defender of the rights of the people and of the French language.

The exterior features one entrance building, which was rebuilt in 1999. Inside, there is a convenience store just before the fare gates. Immediately after the fare gates are the first set of escalators and stairs to the mezzanine level. Halfway down, you reach a mid-level and switch to the second set of escalators or stairs to continue the descent.

Once at the mezzanine, there are several large murals that can be viewed. The corridors and platforms are decorated with beige tiles and occasional brown, green or white tile accents. From the mezzanine, there is an overhead walkway to cross the tracks to reach the other platform. From this area, you can see a beautiful colourful mural that takes advantage of the curved ceiling lines. 

At platform level, the wall decor and floors follow what came before in the mezzanine, and provide views back up to the overhead walkway.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The murals of the station are the most unique and recognizable elements of Papineau station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Papineau station features three murals on the mezzanine level, created by Jean Cartier and George Juhasz. They are entitled "Les Patriotes de 1837-1838". They tell the story of the Patriotes Rebellion and commemorate Louis-Joseph Papineau, the son of Joseph Papineau, the station's namesake.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Beaudry
  • Following Station: Frontenac
  • Entrances: 1

Outremont

Outremont is a station on the Blue Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name comes from the borough of Outremont in which the station is located.

The station has one large entrance with a skylight. This area leads down to the mezzanine level at which a beautiful, glazed terra cotta mural on the wall can be seen. 

After passing through the fare gates on the mezzanine, you pass into a space with a very high ceiling, just above the trains below. The beautiful architecture of the station is very reminiscent of the surrounding neighbourhood, and even includes an old green Borough of Outremont lamp post on the Saint-Michel platform.

The whole station and especially the mezzanine and platform areas are adorned with brown terra cotta tiles, which create a warm and bright space. Seating at the platform level is with stone benches.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station has a big feel to it, from the bright walls and colours to the old Outremont lamp post at the platform level. The mural on the mezzanine is also quite beautiful to see.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main art piece, created by Gilbert Poissant, is located on the mezzanine level and is a mural created with glazed terra cotta tiles and conveys the feeling of a stroll through the streets of Outremont, by transposing the neighbourhood architectural elements into the metro station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Édouard-Montpetit
  • Following Station: Acadie
  • Entrances: 1

Namur

Namur is a station near the western terminus of the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro. 

It received its name from Rue Namur, which was the former name of a portion of Rue Jean-Talon. When the station opened in 1984, the street had been renamed. In 1980, Rue Arnoldi was renamed Rue Namur. There are several retail areas located in proximity to the station, as well as new high-rise/high-density residential developments, all within a short walk to the station.

The station has only one entrance, located at the north end of the station. This entrance has doors on both sides of the street corner it is located, facilitating access from multiple directions of arrival. When you enter inside, the station is fairly unassuming at street level, however heading down to the mezzanine level via two escalators, the sweeping and vaulting ceiling quickly comes into view as well as the main art installation, Système.

On the mezzanine level, there is a small Tabagie convenience store. Heading through to the fare gates, the station then directs people towards either the Côte-Vertu or Montmorency platforms. As previously mentioned, the station has only one entrance, which means you reach the platforms from their north end. The station was originally constructed with the intent of leaving open the possibility of having a second entrance on the other side of the Decarie highway, however to date, this has not been constructed.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The depth of the station combined with the public art piece that is suspended from the ceiling creates a unique look and feel for Namur station. The station's location just kilometres away from the A-40 / A-15 highway interchange allows it to offer easy access for those arriving from the west island and beyond, making it a popular choice to reach the metro network and the rest of the city.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main public art piece at Namur is entitled "Système", created by Quebec artist Pierre Granche. It is a giant illuminated sculpture made from aluminum, arranged in such a way that it appears like a long molecular or particle strand. It is very eye-catching and adds great character and uniqueness to the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 9, 1984
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: De La Savane
  • Following Station: Plamondon
  • Entrances: 1

Montmorency

Montmorency is a station on the Montreal Metro's Orange Line, located on the north shore in Laval. This is the northern terminus of the Orange Line.

The station received its name from François de Montmorency-Laval, who was the first bishop of Quebec and New France from 1674-1688.

The station has several entrances and also includes a large outdoor and indoor parking facility. One entrance is integrated with the bus terminal that serves STL, exo and MRC services. Another is via the indoor parking garage. There is also an indoor integrated entrance with the campus de l'UdeM à Laval and a street-level entrance. All this leads to there being several paths available to reach the Metro. One of the more interesting routes is to pass through the parking garage and take the elevator to the P4 level. From there, a long corridor followed by more stairs/elevators will bring you immediately next to the fare gates. This is an alternative to the usual path of the stairs and long escalators from the surface.

Once at the mezzanine level, you will find the long line of fare gates. Passing through, the departure platform can be reached by the stairs immediately to the left and right. The access to the arrivals platform continues across the enclosed overhead walkway.

The platform area is nicely decorated with colourful angled stripes of tiles, despite being 20 metres below the surface. The ceiling is exceptionally high and vaulting, and is among the highest in the metro network, with arch-shaped supports located underneath. With lots of space, seating along the sides of the platform, and ample illumination, the space is pleasant to wait for the next train. As it is a terminus station, there is usually a train stopped on the departures platform for several minutes, so it is rare to have to wait before being able to board.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The unique features of the station revolve around the many accesses and entrances, the large outdoor and indoor parking (4 levels), as well as the connected university campus and the large bus terminal.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is located above the escalator and stairs linking the upper level to the mezzanine. It is entitled "Les fluides" and was created by Hélène Rochette. It consists of several suspended sculptures, made in bright colours, with plenty of curves, creating an organic shape.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 26, 2007
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: De La Concorde
  • Entrances: 4

Mont-Royal

Mont-Royal is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Mount Royal Avenue, whose french name is "Mont-Royal'.

The station has a unique entrance, at 470 Mount Royal East. The mezzanine is nice and can be similar to the ones at Beaudry and Berri-UQAM where you get the doors in the middle with windows all around and over it. Once inside, you find the escalators and stairs who are quite dark compared to other stations. Then the only ticket booth is placed just before the stairs that lead to the side platforms, which are all in beautiful brown bricks, from the walls to the benches to the floors.

In 2022, a new entrance was opened that allowed the station to become accessible with elevators. As a result, there are additional stairwells available in addition to the previously existing stairs and escalators of the station.

Places of interest include the famous Montreal theatre "Théâtre du Rideau-Vert, as well as the commercial street Mount Royal Avenue.

UNIQUE FEATURES

All of the station was built in a tunnel except for the ticket booth.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

A poem by Gérald Godin, "Tango de Montréal", was put on the wall of the station by a group called "Les industries perdues".

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Sherbrooke
  • Following Station: Laurier
  • Entrances: 1

Monk

Monk is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Monk Boulevard, which was named in honour of lawyer Frederick Monk.

It has two entrances, 6805 Monk and 6750 Monk. Both are similar, in beautiful dark brown bricks. The entrances are relatively small compared to other stations of the network, but once you enter, you can quickly see how vast the station is, and also that the beautiful brown is a theme of the station. The view from the escalators is beautiful and it gives another chance to see how vast and majestic this station is. The walls at the bottom are, contrary to the rest of the station, grey. At the left of the escalators is the convenience store.

The platforms are completely brown from the walls to the floors. The colours are beautiful yet somehow when you look closely the walls show their age.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The bricks on the entrances integrate the Metro's logo. Also, the volume of the mezzanine is equivalent to four levels.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Germain Bergeron did sculptures in painted steel called "Pic et Pelle", which is located on the overpass. It is an honour to the workers who built the metro.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Angrignon
  • Following Station: Jolicoeur
  • Entrances: 2

McGill

McGill is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro, and the most frequented of all stations on the network.

It was named in honour of McGill University, which got its name from its founder, James McGill.

The station has two side platforms. And while most stations of the network are easily recognizable over the years, this one has changed colours many times over the years. Its original colours were orange pillars with yellow on the walls. In the 90s, the pillars were changed to green and the station also had shades of burgundy. But then an advertiser which had orange as a primary colour of its brand took the majority of the advertisement in the station and had the pillars change back to orange. After this sponsorship ended, the pillars were changed to white as part of another company's advertising campaign. Today, the pillars are in red, which is the colour of McGill University.

The station is the busiest of the network due to its downtown location and direct access to many shopping landmarks including Eaton Centre, The Bay and Place Ville-Marie. It also gives access to Montreal Underground.McGill University's 40,000 students also add to the many passengers of the station. Other places of interest in the areas are Musée Grévin and Royal Victoria Hospital.

There are several stores inside the station, including coffee shops Tim Hortons and Second Cup as well as gift shops Carlton Cards and Scotiabank, in addition to 2 pizza shops.

There are six official entrances to the station: 690 de Maisonneuve West, 640 de Maisonneuve West, 811 de Maisonneuve West, 2055 University, 2021 Union, and 1445 Union. Many people will also enter through the RESO Montreal Underground  City.

UNIQUE FEATURES

As well as being part of Montreal Underground, this station used to have a library until 1996.

This station was also featured (along with Beaudry) in "C't'à ton tour, Laura Cadieux", a 1997 Quebec movie.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

In addition to the pillars, there are 5 stained-glass murals made by Nicolas Sollogoub, that were donated by Macdonald Tobacco.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Peel
  • Following Station: Place-des-Arts
  • Entrances: 6

Lucien-L'Allier

Lucien L'Allier is a station on the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of rue Lucien L'Allier, which was named in honour of Lucien L'Allier, an engineer who was a former chairman of the Montreal Transit Commission (which today is the STM) and built the metro. Prior to his death, the planned name for the station was Aqueduc.

The station has only one entrance, on 955 Lucien L'Allier street. It is a beautiful square building in brown bricks with some windows. As soon as you enter, you can see the brown bricks are a pattern of this station and will be there everywhere. The concourse looks very big with a high ceiling that gives a grandiose impression to the station. Again, all the walls are covered in brown bricks with the exception of a firewall made in glass.

Once you reach the platforms, which are among the deepest in the network, the impression is of a much smaller space. Even the benches are made in brown bricks, yet a different pattern.

The biggest point of interest is the Bell Centre. It is home to the Montreal Canadiens but also the place where world-renowned artists come to do their shows while in Montreal. In addition, combat sports like wrestling, boxing and MMA also do shows there. To accommodate the many spectators who use the subway to attend the Bell Centre, the station was modified to include direct access to the building.

Another place of interest is the E-Commerce Place, which is an office tower for many electronic commerce firms, most notably CGI.

UNIQUE FEATURES

It is one of the few stations that connect to the exo commuter trains.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There is a sculptural grille by Jean-Jacques Besner that covers the ventilation shaft at the entrance. It was based on old aqueducts as the original name of the station was supposed to be Aqueduc.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Georges-Vanier
  • Following Station: Bonaventure
  • Entrances: 1

Longueuil–Université-de-Sherbrooke

Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke is a station on the Yellow Line of Montreal's Metro. The name of the station was originally Longueuil, but it was renamed to Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke on September 26, 2003, due to the university being located on the same site. This station was part of the initial metro network, even though it opened to the public nearly six months after the Green and Orange lines. This station is the southern terminus of the line.

This station located on the south shore of the city of Longueuil is found underneath place Charles-Le Moyne, with the platforms at 4.3m below the street level, placing it among the two shallowest stations in the metro network. As a result, the entrances to the station are unique in the entire metro system. Passengers arriving at the station exit the train and head upstairs to reach the building above, without passing through fare gates. Passengers departing head down other stairs and reach the platform level, with the fare gates located directly on the platform and only meters from the metro trains themselves. As such, it is not possible to switch from one platform to the other without having to pass through fare gates.

There are no doors to gain direct access to the metro station from outside, rather, passengers must enter place Charles-Le Moyne to reach the station. Despite its small size, the architecture has a kind of Aztec or Mayan feel to it from the angles and lines embedded in the concrete walls and supports. The ceiling height is fairly low, and the platforms are not very deep, due to the fare gates and booth also being located in the same space.

There have long been discussions of extending the Yellow Line beyond this station, however to this date, there have not been any firm plans or agreements on doing so.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique feature of this station is without a doubt the interesting way passengers enter and exit the station. As it is a terminus station, there are no fare gates on the arrivals platform, as it is only used for passengers disembarking the train. Departing passengers enter the station via place Charles-Le Moyne by stairs and directly reach the platform level. It is here that the fare gates are found, not even 10 feet from the metro trains themselves. This interesting arrangement is unique in the entire metro system and plays heavily in the layout and arrangement of the station.

As interesting as this is, should the line ever be extended beyond this station, it is unclear if it will be possible to modify the station to permit switching from one platform to another without passing through fare gates, in part due to its extremely shallow depth.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There is no official public artwork in this station, however, the concrete supports, angled walls and lines embedded into the concrete do help create a unique look.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 1, 1967
  • Line: 4
  • Previous Station: Jean-Drapeau
  • Entrances: 1

Laurier

Laurier is a station on the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro. It was named in honour of Laurier avenue, which got its name from former Canadian Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

There are two entrances, at 5113 Rivard and 495 Gilford. While neither stands out from the outside, the one on Rivard street is special inside because it has automatic entry doors. This is one of only four stations in the network that have this feature and the only one not on the Blue line. The one on Gilford, however, has the utility of having way more space so people can wait for buses inside, which is handy in the winter when you wait for certain bus routes that pass less frequently.

The side platforms are elegant with their granite wall but what lacks in them is that exits are only at the extremities and each one leads to a different entrance, which means passengers who are not aware may have to walk all over backwards to exit at their preferred spot.

The ceilings are quite low due to the station being built in a tunnel-like its neighbour Mont-Royal.

Places of interest include Ecole nationale de théâtre, and Ecole supérieure de la danse au Québec.

UNIQUE FEATURES

Laurier station platforms couldn't be described without mentioning the spots on the walls over the benches, which are the results of oil on people's hair getting into the granite.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

This station does not have any artwork. The granite walls on the platforms may be the only thing that is worth looking at there.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Mont-Royal
  • Following Station: Rosemont
  • Entrances: 2

Langelier

Langelier is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Langelier Boulevard, which was named in honour of politician Sir François Langelier.

The station has three entrances: 6595 Sherbrooke East, 6610 Sherbrooke East and 3355 Langelier. The three entrances, which are at 3 corners of an intersection, share a beautiful sombre square design in tones of granite. Only the lights and metro logo are added to the exterior.

The mezzanine is in the form of an arch, which reminds us of most Washington, D.C. metro stations. When you add the lights on the ceiling, it adds an element of design unique to this station. It is situated at a level relatively close to the tracks so you quickly feel the ambiance of the subway.

The stairs leading to the side platforms are beautifully designed, and a stainless steel ramp, visible from the platform, matches the stainless steel that is present all around the platforms, most notably the circular cut-outs sculptural grilles made by Charles Daudelin.

There are a few points of interest around the station. The mall Centre Domaine may be the most famous place near it.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The grilles of Daudelin are quite unique. Also, the lights above the entrance's doors are between two squares with holes in front of circles which is a unique design element.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

As with so many things as far as this station is concerned, it all goes back to the stainless steel grilles of Charles Daudelin, which are classic yet original with each one having a different color inside the opening.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Cadillac
  • Following Station: Radisson
  • Entrances: 3

Joliette

Joliette is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. The station's name originates from the nearby rue Joliette, which itself was named after Barthélémy Joliette, who served in the House of Assembly and Legislative Council of Lower Canada.

The station has two entrances, located on either side of rue Hochelaga. Once inside either entrance, a short descent to the mezzanine level rejoins both entrances and presents the fare gates in the middle of the space, along with a convenience store. The ceiling in this area is arched and rounded. After passing through the fare gates, the art piece of the station is easily seen, which depicts the planets of the solar system.

Stairs to the platforms are located to the sides and reach the platforms below from the sides. The platforms are built in a tunnelled section of the station, resulting in a low ceiling. The platforms are decorated with unique yellow brick tiling on the walls and red seats. 

Joliette is a rather simple station to navigate and pass through, thanks to its bright colours and lively spaces.

UNIQUE FEATURES

A unique feature of Joliette station is how both entrances' interiors are mirror images of each other and meet up together on the mezzanine level.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The artwork in this station is located on the mezzanine just past the fair gates and was created by Marcel Raby. It is a collection of colourful lit glass designs that represent the planets of the solar system, with planet Earth located in the middle. The mirror-finished steel around the planets reflects the image of the travellers and represents the unity of the planets and human beings in the universe.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Préfontaine
  • Following Station: Pie-IX
  • Entrances: 2

Jolicoeur

Jolicoeur is a station on the Green Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Jolicoeur street, which takes its name from priest Jean-Moise Jolicoeur.

It has only one entrance, at 6200 Drake, and it is beautiful. It takes the shape of a large hall the size of a two-storey building, with tinted windows all over. The mezzanine is very large and very practical. There are doors on both sides of the entrance and passengers who enter will quickly find their way as on one side is the convenience store and on the other the turnstiles, which quickly lead to the stairs that lead to the platforms. Like Angrignon, this station is not that deep so no escalators are needed. And, also like Angrignon, this station is receiving natural light on the platform from the mezzanine windows.

The platforms are very nice, with walls covered from grey bricks which, originally, are vertically installed. The black name bars are installed on red placeholders that add just the perfect element of colour. The floor has some orange triangles pointing to the track inside black circles, even though, contrary to what may be expected, they do not point at where doors open. The benches are red, similar to those at Radisson, and the ends of the platforms on both sides of the tunnels are painted orange. Another thing that is interesting in this station is if you look at the tunnel in the Angrignon direction, you will see a big curve and it's interesting seeing trains arrive and leave through it.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is one of the best stations to watch trains from the mezzanine as they pass right under the floor, and with the windows all over it, it's one of the most scenic places for train watchers.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The 42 orange triangles on the floor, made by Claude Boucher (who also worked on Honoré Beaugrand station), give this station's platform one of the best floors of the network.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 3, 1978
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Monk
  • Following Station: Verdun
  • Entrances: 1

Jean-Talon

Jean-Talon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of Jean-Talon street, which was named in honour of Jean Talon, who was intendant of New France.

The station has four entrances, 7100 Berri, 430 Jean-Talon East, 522 Jean-Talon East, and a fully automated entrance on 780 Jean-Talon East. The entrances are all nice and attractive, each being more independent looking than the others. Having been built in different eras, they constitute a good mix of materials and colours, and each one has its own charm.

The Orange line was originally the only one at this station, and its side platforms are the highest. Their design is relatively modest, with the majority of the walls and floor being in tones of grey. The floor around the sections which lead to the Blue line are orange as a way of showing those who arrive that this is the Orange line platform. Since the Blue line service ends earlier, there are grills that can be closed when it's not in service.

In order to link the Orange line and Blue line platforms, large volumes were built on both sides of the station. They are beautiful, with orange and blue flooring and greyish walls. Directional panels are suspended from the ceiling, and are also in orange and blue, with their look similar to those at Snowdon, although there they are installed on the walls instead of from the ceiling. Also in these spaces, you can see some chazy limestone, which is the rock from which the station was built.

In order not to close the Orange line when the Blue line was built, the Blue line was built with stacked platforms. The Snowdon platform is the upper one. Trains on this platform have doors opening on the left. The highlight of this platform is a wall mural by Judith Bricault Klein that represents the transfer between the two lines. The Saint-Michel platform is lower and despite having a blue floor and blue seats (like the Snowdon platform), the walls are more in tones of grey and brown.

Points of interest include Plaza Saint-Hubert, which is a group of stores and restaurants grouped together, and also Jean-Talon market, Little Italy, as well as Tour Jean-Talon, which is an office tower from which an entry to the station is integrated.

UNIQUE FEATURES

One unique feature is the stacked platforms on the Blue line which also result in trains on Snowdon platforms having doors open on the left. It is also the only station in the network that was built as a single-line station and was changed into a transfer station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

One of the most beautiful artworks in all the network is Judith Bricault Klein's enamelled steel mural of 256 panels. Another great piece of art is Gilbert Sauvé's mural on both of the Blue line platforms, which are blue arrows combined with orange circles on concrete which indicate the direction the trains are going.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966 (Line 2) & June 16, 1986 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Beaubien (Line 2) & De Castelnau (Line 5)
  • Following Station: Jarry (Line 2) & Fabre (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 4

Jean-Drapeau

Jean-Drapeau is a station on the Yellow line of the Montreal Metro.

Originally called Île-Sainte-Hélène, its name changed to Jean-Drapeau in May 2001, two years after the death of Jean Drapeau, who was the Montreal Mayor who decided to have a metro in the city.

The station has only one entrance, 170 Île-Sainte-Hélène. It is very well conceived as there is lots of space in front for the large crowds that sometimes come with the attractions that are around. Then when you enter, large signs hang from the ceiling and indicate which direction leads to which city. Montreal on the left (via Berri-UQAM) and Longueuil on the right (via Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke). The concourse is very practical as once you pass the turnstiles, it doesn't have anything except space, which can be quite practical after a Formula 1 race ends and all the people attending are rushing to the station at the same time. The stairs (in a set of three per platform) are right in front of the entry, each platform on its side, so passengers can quickly find where they need to go. Also since often the very large majority of passengers are either entering or exiting the station, all stairs are regular stairs and the station has no escalators.

The stairs are leading directly to the centre of their respective platforms, and again there are large spaces at the bottom of them. However, passengers who want to go on the sides of the platform will find it gets much more narrow, but those who stay in the center can see the opposite platform's large space and get the impression of a much deeper station.

Points of interest include the Montreal Casino, the Montreal Biosphere, which is an environmental museum but is as famous for its shape as a geodesic dome, Six Flags amusement park La Ronde, as well as Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve, which is a world-renowned motorsport track which has hosted major series including Formula 1, Nascar and sports cars.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The tracks between this station and Berri-UQAM are the deepest point in the network where they reach 55m below ground.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Jean Dumontier painted 4 murals on the walls of the platforms which are based on the theme of Expo 67, "A Man and His World".

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1967
  • Line: 4
  • Previous Station: Berri-UQAM
  • Following Station: Longueuil-Université-de-Sherbrooke
  • Entrances: 1

Jarry

Jarry is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. The station is named after rue Jarry, which itself was named after Bernard Bleinier dit Jarry.

The station is in proximity to Parc Jarry, one of the large parks in the City of Montreal, although De Castelnau and Parc stations are physically closer.

The station has two entrances, one is a standalone entrance building, while the other is integrated into the ground floor of an apartment building built above. Long escalators connect the entrance to the mezzanine level underneath. On the mezzanine, the ceiling is made almost like a honeycomb, with illumination in each cell. The floor is mostly white tile, however, there are artistic circle formations of coloured tiles near the fare gates and the start of the overhead walkway to cross to the other platform access.

The walkway itself is long and narrow, with low sides, drawing attention to the contrast between the lightly coloured walkway and the darker platform area below.

Once at platform level, the floor changes to an assortment of various dark brown coloured tiles, framed with stainless steel benches for seating along the sides.

UNIQUE FEATURES

An interesting aspect of this station is how one of its entrances is integrated with the ground level of an apartment building. Another is the unique honeycomb ceiling.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There isn't any official artwork at this station, however, outside of the main entrance, there is a concrete overhang canopy, which has been painted by street artists, providing colour to the exterior entrance area of the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Jean-Talon
  • Following Station: Crémazie
  • Entrances: 2

Honoré-Beaugrand

Honoré-Beaugrand is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. It has been the eastern terminus of the line since it opened in 1976, replacing the former terminus at Frontenac. It received its name from the street at which it is found, rue Honoré-Beaugrand, which itself was named after Honoré Beaugrand, who served as mayor of Montreal from 1885-1887 and was a French-Canadian journalist, author and folklorist.

The station features three entrances, two of which reach large bus loops that serve many routes from the east end of the island. Once inside the station, the sprawling mezzanine area quickly comes into view. It features several retail outlets such as coffee shops and convenience stores. Natural light also enters this area through several small skylights in the ceiling.

A large and wide fare gate area is located at the western end of the mezzanine and leads to the platforms below. Just before the stairs to reach the platforms, a nice blue-tinted glass window overlooks the centre of the tracks. 

As the station is a terminus, the platform to the left is for passengers disembarking the train, while departing passengers pass towards the right side for trains bound towards Angrignon.

The main artwork of the station is found on the stairs of the platforms. It is a blue and red ceramic tile mural and adds tremendous colour and ambiance to this space.

The platforms themselves are large and expansive and the walls step closer together by the far end. Large skylights also help draw in more natural light to this space, ensuring a nice pleasant and warm environment to wait and board the next train.

UNIQUE FEATURES

As the station is a terminus, it is configured for high passenger volume entering and exiting the station. The mezzanine is unusually large and contains several retailers, in addition to plenty of space to sit and spread out. The beautiful artwork, combined with the natural light from the skylights and the blue-tinted windows, all come together nicely to give Honoré-Beaugrand station a unique and inviting character to experience and discover.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is a pair of ceramic murals, found on both platforms of the station. They were created by Jean-Paul Mousseau, and form two abstract and symmetrical murals. The predominantly blue mural on the south wall is repeated on the north wall in red. Together, they are very stunning and colourful and successfully add lots of character and life to the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 6, 1976
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Radisson
  • Entrances: 3

Henri-Bourassa

Henri-Bourassa is a part-time eastern terminus of the Orange line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Henri-Bourassa boulevard, which is a major boulevard in Montreal, which was named in honour of Henri Bourassa, who made his mark both as a politician and as a newspaper publisher, being the one who founded the newspaper "Le Devoir".

The station has four entrances: 10670 Berri, 575 Henri-Bourassa, 590 Henri-Bourassa, and 10765 Lajeunesse. The station is relatively large, which can be useful for a terminus as it's easier to clear the platforms once everyone exits a train, especially since many of them will then board many different buses of either the STM or STL.

Most of the station is built with motifs of brown bricks that are nice to look at. That section was built in 1966 but in 2007 when the Laval portion was added to the Orange line, a 3rd platform was built, which makes the original side platform in use for trains still using the station as the terminus and all trains going in Côté Vertu direction. Trains who go to Montmorency use the new platform that is by itself at the right the Montmorency platform, yet separated by a wall, with trains opening doors on the left side. The new platform is much more modern, with stainless steel and grey colour tones.

Points of interest are Parc Ahuntsic (including Gary-Carter baseball stadium) as well as another park, Ile-de-la-Visitation.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is the only single-line station to have three platforms. Also, it is the only station to be a part-time terminus, as when the extension to Laval was made, it was decided that during rush hours, some trains would still use Henri-Bourassa as the terminus.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There is a concrete mural made by Jacques Huet called "Réveil de la conscience par la solitude". It combines art with practicality as it also serves as a firewall with the opposite building.

Another artwork is called .98 (sometimes referred to as Point 98 in French), and was done by Axel Morgenthaler. It consists of 98 LEDs on stainless steel, which together are forming the shape of a trapezoid. Situated in the corridor between the terminal platforms and the one for Montmorency, those lights consist of the three primary colours and therefore can create basically any colour and evolve all over the day.


STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966 (original station) and April 28, 2007 (3rd Platform)
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Sauvé
  • Following Station: Cartier
  • Entrances: 4

Guy-Concordia

Guy-Concordia is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. The station was originally named Guy for the street on which it is found (rue Guy), however, in 1988, it was renamed Guy-Concordia to recognize that it serves the Concordia University campus.

The station has two entrances, both integrated into other buildings such as the university.  Since 2010, all main buildings of Concordia University's campus connect underground to the Guy-Concordia station. On the mezzanine level, there is a fair number of retail outlets, including coffee shops and more. 

The station's layout is fairly straightforward. Once through the fare gates, additional escalators bring passengers down to the lower level, where they can reach either platform by way of an overhead walkway. The access to the platforms has additional visual appeal as there are bright red, yellow, grey and black ceramic tiles on the floor and walls by the stairs. The stairs also reach the platforms about 15-20 feet ahead of the end of the train, which is fairly rare in the metro. After the stairs, the visual look changes to a more standard grey and white tile floor and wall arrangement along the rest of the platform, however, the bright red colours return for the seating areas and seats themselves.

UNIQUE FEATURES

One unique aspect of this station is the fact that it was the first metro station to be designed by the city's architects. As such, a lot of the design elements used in other stations of the original metro network were first developed here.

The station is always among the top 5 busiest stations on the metro system due to its downtown location and its connection with the university it serves.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Atwater
  • Following Station: Peel
  • Entrances: 2

Georges-Vanier

Georges-Vanier is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named for the nearby boulevard Georges-Vanier, which itself was named for the Rt. Hon. Georges-Philias Vanier.

The station features only one entrance and is located in a residential area, just outside of downtown Montréal. The station has a very clean and conservative look with the dark tile floor and brick walls. From the entrance to the mezzanine and finally to the platforms, the path taken is a bit long and windy but interesting all the same.

Once past the fare gates, the main art installation of the station comes into view. It is a large concrete tree, illuminated from a single skylight at the surface. Passing alongside the tree are the accesses and walkways to the platforms.

At the platform level, the decor changes in the tunnelled portion of the station to be various shades of blue ceramic tiles on the walls. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

Georges-Vanier is located between Lionel-Groulx and Lucien L'Allier, two fairly busy stations, yet this station is very quiet by comparison. Overall, the station was ranked second to last in terms of passenger volume for 2020, and as a result, is often very quiet and calm. With the nice seating on the mezzanine near the tree, it can be a nice spot to sit down and rest.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is entitled "Un arbre dans le parc" and was created by Michel Dernuet. It is a large concrete pillar in the shape of a tree, that has illumination integrated into its branches. The tree is located on the Côte-Vertu side of the platforms, while the Montmorency side features blue ceramics, which symbolize a fresh spring in the woods.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 1980
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Lionel-Groulx
  • Following Station: Lucien-L'Allier
  • Entrances: 1

Frontenac

Frontenac is a station on the Green Line of Montreal's Metro. It is named after nearby rue Frontenac, which itself was named for Louis de Buade, sieur de Frontenac et de Pallau.

The station features one entrance, which was rebuilt in 1999. An interesting fact about this station is that although it was part of the original green line when the Metro opened in 1966, this station opened 2 months later than the initial system. It would then serve as the western terminus of the green line until 1976 when the line was extended to its current terminus at Honoré-Beaugrand.

The station has a simple layout and aesthetic. From inside the entrance, there is a convenience store and the fare gates. The escalators and stairs are found immediately beyond the gates. Similar to neighbouring Papineau station, the trip down to the mezzanine level is completed via several escalators. Once there, the layout is rather simple, the corridor branches off into an overhead walkway with stairs on both sides to reach the platforms. The overall look of the lower levels of the station is rather flat and monotonous. Beige, whites and greys colour the floor and walls of the mezzanine and platforms. The platforms received some new modular panelling that contains small tiling consisting of various beige/grey tones to give some texture to the deep platforms.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station is unique in how flat and monotonous it becomes at the mezzanine and platform levels. There is also no public artwork to highlight at this station either.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: December 19, 1966
  • Line: 1
  • Previous Station: Papineau
  • Following Station: Préfontaine
  • Entrances: 1

Fabre

Fabre is a station on the Blue Line of Montreal's Metro. The station received its name from nearby rue Fabre, which itself honours Monseigneur Édouard-Charles Fabre, who was Montreal's first archbishop.

This station has two entrances, one of which has a convenience store at the surface. This entrance is also quite spacious inside with the escalators and stairs located nearly in the middle of the large space. It is also surrounded by glass, bringing in lots of natural light. 

Heading down into the station, the signature-coloured panelling makes its appearance along most of the walls of the station. Made up primarily of various shades of blue, green and purple, they stretch from the entrances right through the platforms. The mezzanine levels have a honeycomb-style ceiling, which integrates the lighting for those spaces.

Platform-level seating almost resembles little seat pods sticking out from the panelled walls. A continuous handrail runs nearly the entire length of the platforms and artistically wraps itself around the shapes and curves of the wall panels.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The look of the station itself is very colourful with the coloured wall panelling. This creates a very calm and inviting space to be in and discover.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is the coloured panelled walls and the handrail. It was created by artist Jean-Noël Poliquin. The panels are coloured polymer concrete, while the handrail is stainless steel.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 16, 1986
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Jean-Talon
  • Following Station: D'Iberville
  • Entrances: 2

Édouard-Montpetit

Édouard-Montpetit is a station on the Blue line of the Montreal Metro.

The station's original name was supposed to be Vincent d'Indy because a music school of the same name is located near the station, but before its opening, the name was changed to Édouard-Montpetit in honour of Édouard-Montpetit Boulevard, under which the station is located. That boulevard got its name in honour of lawyer Edouard Montpetit.

The station has three entrances: 2030 Édouard-Montpetit, 2040 Édouard-Montpetit, and 80 Vincent-d'Indy. They are all shaped in original forms. The one on Vincent-d'Indy is in the shape of a teardrop, which makes it particularly attractive and unique. Another trait the entrances share is the fact that they are relatively small compared to other stations' entrances, as they basically only contain stairs that lead to the underground station. Their exterior, like all the interior, is adorned with red colour. Some of the interiors even have pink. Those colours were selected when the station was expected to be called Vincent-d'Indy, because they represented the smoothness of music composed by Vincent d'Indy. When the name was changed, the design stayed.

Due to some entrances being remote, the path to the station itself may be longer than most stations, but nobody will complain because the architecture and colours make you want to be there. The red and pink, mixed with white and grey in a modern yet classic design results in one of the most beautiful stations in the whole network. There are also lights both on the ceiling and on the walls that are covered by beautiful round lampshades that add to the beauty of the journey to reach the station. Once you reach the turnstiles, you go down on an escalator which quickly leads to the platforms. In a concept similar to Côte-des-Neiges, you have the stairs for the Saint-Michel platform on both sides, while the middle lane is the overpass to the Snowdon platform.

The platform's main attraction is the benches, with their bright red continuing below by forming vertical stripes that curve on top to go over the head of passengers. They have a way to bring light to the mind, and can easily awaken students of both the Vincent-d'Indy music school and the nearby Université de Montréal after a hard school day.

Although this station, like many of those on the Blue line, might be one of the lesser known to the general public, it wasn't necessarily the plan, as it was originally planned as a transfer station between the Blue line and a future line that was never built, nor advertised. And even though it took more than 35 years, it may finally become a transfer station in the future as the REM has a station planned there.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The red benches are quite unique. However, it may get even more unique in the future by being a transfer station with the REM, and also, since the REM platforms will be lower, it is expected to become the second deepest station in North America.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Although no official artwork is in the station, we need to highlight the work of architect Patrice Gauthier as a whole as the entire station deserves to be considered as a work of art by itself.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Université de Montréal
  • Following Station: Outremont
  • Entrances: 3

Du Collège

Du Collège is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from the nearby rue du Collège, whose name commemorates the nearby Cégep de Saint-Laurent, which was originally inaugurated as a college in 1847.

The station has two entrances from the street level. Upon entering the station, beautiful illuminated stained glass frames the first escalator passageway, with others located along the outer walls of the mid-level. Once at the mezzanine, the ceiling forms a vaulting and sweeping line above, supported by majestic pillars. 

Beyond the fare gates, stairs and elevators give access to the side platforms of the station. In this area, the floor features various patterns such as circles and diamonds, in the tiled flooring. A warm red coloured brick makes up the walls of the platforms. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

The unique features of the station are the vaulting sweeping ceiling above the mezzanine, as well as the beautifully illuminated stained glass located between the entrance and the escalators.

The Ionic column on the mezzanine supporting the ceiling is unique in the metro system.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The are several stained-glass windows in the station, created by several different artists.

The northern entrance contains four stained glass windows, one created by Lyse Charland Favretti, and three created by Pierre Osterrath.

The southern entrance contains another stained-glass window Lyse Charland Favretti, as well as an abstract relief in brick by Aurelio Sandonato.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 9, 1984
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Côte-Vertu
  • Following Station: De La Savane
  • Entrances: 2

De La Savane

De La Savane is a station on the Orange Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from nearby rue De La Savane.

De La Savane is one of the most visually stunning on the metro system. The rather ordinary entrance building on the surface hides quite well what is to be experienced inside.

From the moment of entering the station, it quickly becomes apparent that it is unlike most others. The walls and ceiling all have special mural-like treatments to them, featuring lots of rough or smooth angled lines and curves. The integrated light fixtures are round orbs, that protrude from the walls. All the elements combine to create something very organic, futuristic or other-worldly in this underground space. Once at the mezzanine level, a large metal sculpture, attached to the wall, reaches up and is illuminated by natural light entering from above.

Once past the fare gates, the side platforms are accessed from the sides. The arched lines of the tunnelled portion of the station, again featuring the orb-style lights, help continue the theme and look to the farthest reaches of the station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

De La Savane is unique in its consistent theme and look. From the orb lights to the special design treatment of the walls and ceiling, it is amazing to see the signature elements of the station maintained throughout and not just localized to one area. It definitely is a must-visit station on the Metro system.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main public artwork is a tall metal sculpture on the mezzanine level, entitled Calcite, created by Maurice Lemieux. Natural light entering from above helps illuminate the sculpture. The sculpture's name and shape are derived from the natural mineral calcite, which the artist predicted would be found in the rock surrounding the station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 9, 1984
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Du Collège
  • Following Station: Namur
  • Entrances: 1

De la Concorde

De La Concorde is a station on the Orange Line of the Montreal Metro. This station also provides a connection to the adjacent exo commuter train line to St-Jerome at the surface.

It is one of the most recent stations to open and was part of the Orange Line's expansion into Laval, which opened in 2007. The station is named after the nearby boulevard de la Concorde, which itself is named after the Place de la Concorde in Paris, France. The station is visually stunning, starting with the surface-level entrance that features the famous metro logo on its glass windows. As you approach the escalators and stairs, you pass underneath a large sweeping glass dome, which accentuates the descent into the cavernous station below. The dome accentuates the depth of the station and the journey underground. 

Once at the mezzanine level, passing through the fare gates leads you to the accesses to the platforms, located directly ahead and to the sides. The stairs and platforms are separated by beautiful glass curtain walls, featuring enlarged green grass imagery, creating this bright and colourful ambiance in an otherwise deep place. The station cavern also has several skylights, allowing natural light to enter from above. The light rays that get cast on the walls also shift with the passage of the day.

Further along, in the tunnelled section of the platforms, the walls transform into blue ceramic tiles, adding much colour to this smaller space. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique features of the station are certainly the glass dome, as well as the green grass imagery on the glass at the platforms. All of this combines to create a bright, inviting place to experience and wait for the metro. De La Concorde is among the top must-visit stations on the metro network.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The public artwork is located outside of the station, just across from the glass dome. It is entitled "Nos allers-retours", which translated means "our departures and returns", quite fitting for a train and metro station. It is made up of various metal pipes and tubes that are twisted and tangled together, in the colours of the metro's lines. The colour purple is added into the mix to represent the nearby exo train station. This artwork was created by Yves Gendreau.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: April 28, 2007
  • Line: 2
  • Previous Station: Cartier
  • Following Station: Montmorency
  • Entrances: 1