Line 1 - Green Line

Snowdon

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Snowdon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of the Snowdon neighbourhood, which also happens to host three more stations (Côté Sainte-Catherine, Côte-des-Neiges and Villa-Maria).

The station has only one entrance, on 5111 Queen-Mary Road. It has a beautiful design, and it is part of an office building of the STM. Having four storeys, the two higher levels are longer than the second level, who is longer than the first. That means you walk under the higher levels to enter the station. Once in, there are quick stairs that lead to the ticket booth and turnstiles, followed by escalators that give an awesome view of the lights suspended from the ceiling that are put on circles that do a nice pattern.

Once you are at the bottom of the stairs, you reach the central tunnel, as the station was built in three tunnels, the central one for the passengers to walk to their destinations and go up and down the different platforms, while the two other tunnels are the tracks and platforms. The tunnels are connected to each other via cross-tunnels.

The upper level has the terminus platform of the Blue line, called the Snowdon platform, and on the other side is the Côte Vertu platform on the Orange line. On both sides, train doors open on the left. On the lower levels, trains go in the opposite direction and doors open on the right.

The colours of the station are mainly tones of brown.

The main point of interest is Saint Joseph's Oratory, which is approximately mid-way between Snowdon and Côte-des-Neiges stations. There is also the Décarie autoroute which passes just next to the Snowdon station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

While this section is usually one of the hardest to fill on most stations, this one won't be hard to fill. First of all, since the platforms are built in individual tunnels, they have unique shapes of half circles. Also, the way the cross-tunnels are built, you can wait for your train in them and get a much grandiose view which is quite unique in the network. Since the upper platform doors open on the left, that is also quite unique.

Another unique feature of the station is the maps that are used in the station are different shapes than the rest of the maps in the network (Snowdon is more square while others are more rectangular). They are put on some cubic boxes with lights inside. Some old school metrophiles enjoyed the fact that it stayed many years with older maps, which included old station names (like Berri-de-Montigny instead of Berri-UQAM) and still had Henri-Bourassa as the terminus of the orange line. Snowdon is also the only station of the network to have been the terminus of two lines, as it was the western terminus of the orange line in 1981. Finally, Snowdon is the only terminus station of the network that has stacked platforms.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The station's main artwork is wall murals by Claude Guité, which are situated on the walls that passengers look at while waiting for their train (the wall behind which trains passed by). Those murals represent each season, and they are spring (Montmorency platform), summer (Saint-Michel), autumn (Snowdon) and winter (Côté Vertu).

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 7 1981 (Line 2) & January 4 1988 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Côte-Sainte-Catherine (Line 2)
  • Following Station: Villa-Maria (Line 2) & Côte-des-Neiges (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 1

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Côte-des-Neiges

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Côte-des-Neiges is a station on the Blue line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Côte-des-Neiges Road, which is where its two entrances are located, one in front of the other, on 5316 and 5351 Côte-des-Neiges Road. The western entrance is the main one, and the building is very sober and elegant, with its brownish colours giving the impression it could be a funeral home. Once you enter, you go through an escalator that will bring you to the concourse. There, you will find the ticket barriers and once you pass them, you can go straight to a mini set of stairs in the middle of the way that will bring you to the Saint-Michel platform or walk on the side of it, which is the overpass to go on the Snowdon platform. The eastern entrance is integrated into a National Bank building and joins the concourse via a corridor.

The platforms are really beautiful, they are modern and low-key, giving them a classy look in dark grey granite.

Points of interest include the Saint-Joseph's Oratory, which is approximately mid-way between Snowdon and Côte-des-Neiges, as well as the Notre Dame des Neiges cemetery, the Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine, the Jewish General Hospital and the Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is one of the rare stations where there isn't an escalator between the ticket barriers and the platforms.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

There are stained-glass murals by Claude Bettinger at the main entrance. It consists of coloured stripes coming down vertically and then diagonally, which represents individuals' life courses which meet others or split over time.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Snowdon
  • Following Station: Université-de-Montréal
  • Entrances: 2

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Université-de-Montréal

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Université de Montréal is a station on the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of the university of the same name, under which the station is located. This is a major university that also includes Polytechnique Montreal and HEC Montreal.

This station has three entrances: 2830 Édouard-Montpetit, 5400 Louis-Colin and 2810 Édouard-Montpetit. The one on 2830 Édouard-Montpetit, which is the main one, is one of the most beautiful entrances of the network, being integrated into a mountain. The front consists mostly of windows, which are beautiful in daylight and magic at night with the impact of the indoor lights.

The inside of the station is done in beautiful brown bricks, which are everywhere inside. The turnstiles area is also very attractive as it has some natural light from the exterior.

The platforms are quite sombre with only the brown bricks on the walls, yet it is far from boring to look at as not only are they beautiful, the architecture of the station is made so beautifully, from the stairs to the overpass to the ceiling, that this station is always fun to be at.

In addition to the University, another point of interest is the Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine, one of the biggest pediatric hospitals in North America.

UNIQUE FEATURES

If you enter through the Louis-Colin entrance, you will reach the station through a corridor over the platforms, which is unique in the network.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

André Léonard made two murals made of terra-cotta blocks. The main one, over the tracks and platforms, represents the four classic elements of the universe (air, water, fire, and earth). The other one is in the Louis-Colin corridor and it consists of arrows pointing to the exit.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Côte-des-Neiges
  • Following Station: Édouard-Montpetit
  • Entrances: 3

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Édouard-Montpetit

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Édouard-Montpetit is a station on the Blue line of the Montreal Metro.

The station's original name was supposed to be Vincent d'Indy because a music school of the same name is located near the station, but before its opening, the name was changed to Édouard-Montpetit in honour of Édouard-Montpetit Boulevard, under which the station is located. That boulevard got its name in honour of lawyer Edouard Montpetit.

The station has three entrances: 2030 Édouard-Montpetit, 2040 Édouard-Montpetit, and 80 Vincent-d'Indy. They are all shaped in original forms. The one on Vincent-d'Indy is in the shape of a teardrop, which makes it particularly attractive and unique. Another trait the entrances share is the fact that they are relatively small compared to other stations' entrances, as they basically only contain stairs that lead to the underground station. Their exterior, like all the interior, is adorned with red colour. Some of the interiors even have pink. Those colours were selected when the station was expected to be called Vincent-d'Indy, because they represented the smoothness of music composed by Vincent d'Indy. When the name was changed, the design stayed.

Due to some entrances being remote, the path to the station itself may be longer than most stations, but nobody will complain because the architecture and colours make you want to be there. The red and pink, mixed with white and grey in a modern yet classic design results in one of the most beautiful stations in the whole network. There are also lights both on the ceiling and on the walls that are covered by beautiful round lampshades that add to the beauty of the journey to reach the station. Once you reach the turnstiles, you go down on an escalator which quickly leads to the platforms. In a concept similar to Côte-des-Neiges, you have the stairs for the Saint-Michel platform on both sides, while the middle lane is the overpass to the Snowdon platform.

The platform's main attraction is the benches, with their bright red continuing below by forming vertical stripes that curve on top to go over the head of passengers. They have a way to bring light to the mind, and can easily awaken students of both the Vincent-d'Indy music school and the nearby Université de Montréal after a hard school day.

Although this station, like many of those on the Blue line, might be one of the lesser known to the general public, it wasn't necessarily the plan, as it was originally planned as a transfer station between the Blue line and a future line that was never built, nor advertised. And even though it took more than 35 years, it may finally become a transfer station in the future as the REM has a station planned there.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The red benches are quite unique. However, it may get even more unique in the future by being a transfer station with the REM, and also, since the REM platforms will be lower, it is expected to become the second deepest station in North America.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Although no official artwork is in the station, we need to highlight the work of architect Patrice Gauthier as a whole as the entire station deserves to be considered as a work of art by itself.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Université de Montréal
  • Following Station: Outremont
  • Entrances: 3

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Outremont

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Outremont is a station on the Blue Line of Montreal's Metro. Its name comes from the borough of Outremont in which the station is located.

The station has one large entrance with a skylight. This area leads down to the mezzanine level at which a beautiful, glazed terra cotta mural on the wall can be seen. 

After passing through the fare gates on the mezzanine, you pass into a space with a very high ceiling, just above the trains below. The beautiful architecture of the station is very reminiscent of the surrounding neighbourhood, and even includes an old green Borough of Outremont lamp post on the Saint-Michel platform.

The whole station and especially the mezzanine and platform areas are adorned with brown terra cotta tiles, which create a warm and bright space. Seating at the platform level is with stone benches.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station has a big feel to it, from the bright walls and colours to the old Outremont lamp post at the platform level. The mural on the mezzanine is also quite beautiful to see.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main art piece, created by Gilbert Poissant, is located on the mezzanine level and is a mural created with glazed terra cotta tiles and conveys the feeling of a stroll through the streets of Outremont, by transposing the neighbourhood architectural elements into the metro station.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: January 4, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Édouard-Montpetit
  • Following Station: Acadie
  • Entrances: 1

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Acadie

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Acadie is a station on the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It got its name from Boulevard de l'Acadie, which was named to commemorate the Expulsion of the Acadians.

The station has two entrances, 6900 Boulevard de l'Acadie and 999 Beaumont. Both entrances have characteristics that are often seen on the Blue line stations, which are classic styles mixed with originality. The colours are a mix of grey and brown which produced a beautiful result and added with diagonal shapes of the walls, the overall result is very artistic. Even the entry doors are placed diagonally, and the fact that the higher part of the station continues further than the lower part adds an element of design which results in passengers walking under the higher part to enter, which is also practical when it rains as it gives passengers time to open umbrellas without being covered by rain first.

Once you enter, you will find that even the escalators and stairs are placed diagonally, which creates a nice theme. On the walls, you can see beautiful black and matte granite squares. Once you are at the bottom of the first set of stairs, you see that some red colour is integrated into the matte floor. After taking the second set of escalators or stairs, you reached the turnstiles that are immediately to the right. You can also see that here it's blue that is integrated with the matte floor. Once you pass the turnstiles, you can quickly reach some small set of stairs that reach the platforms at a diagonal angle which gives you a beautiful view. The walls also have black and matte granite squares with the addition of blue ceramic making a diagonal line throughout the walls, which can also combine as a backrest where there are seats. The view from the platform also consists of seeing the overpass which is again beautifully designed in a diagonal shape.

Point of interest Place l'Acadie-Beaumont shopping centre, but passengers can also use the 100 bus to reach Centre Rockland, which is a major shopping centre in Montreal.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The diagonal shapes give this station a unique look. Also, this station was featured in the 2000 film Maelstrom, by Denis Villeneuve.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Météore Design created a bench which is combined with a clock and called "Lieu de rendez-vous". It is an art deco style and is located in the mezzanine.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: March 28, 1988
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Outremont
  • Following Station: Parc
  • Entrances: 2

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Parc

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Parc is a station on the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It received its name from Avenue du Parc.

The station has only one entrance, which is at 7245 Hutchison Street, the historical Park Avenue Station for trains of the Canadian Pacific Railway from 1931 to 1984. It is a beautiful building that kept its beauty over the years even after being abandoned between its functions as a train station to the current one as a metro station. It is made in the art deco style and its four pillars in the front give a look like it would be an official residence or host to an important institution.

Once you enter the mezzanine, you quickly realize how vast it is. The ceiling is very high and there is a lot of room for passengers to move which makes it very practical. The escalators and stairs lead to the fare control zone which is more modern. Once you pass the turnstiles, you see a frieze on the wall, which will be a theme all over the station including the platforms. Another nice aspect of the platform is the beauty of the overpass which has barriers that are much higher than other stations, yet it is very practical as it makes it impossible to accidentally fall on the track. Passengers can still look at ongoing trains through the four windows in the shape of circles.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This station is one of the few that are also an Exo commuter rail station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Suspended in the light shaft at the ceiling of the mezzanine is a work of art by Claire Sarrasin named "Métamorphose d'Icare". It is a sculpture that has the shape of a wing and is surrounded by mirrors, which gives the impression that there are multiple wings. It can also look like a flower or a butterfly.

There is also a frieze by Huguette Desjardins that goes throughout the station. Made with triangular folds, it can give the impression of having different colours depending on the angle you look from.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 15, 1987 (Metro) & 1931 (as Park Avenue train station)
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Acadie
  • Following Station:  De Castelnau
  • Entrances: 1

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De Castelnau

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De Castelnau is a station on the Blue Line of Montreal's Metro. It received its name from nearby rue De Castelnau, which itself is named for French general Noël Édouard, vicomte de Curières de Castelneau.

The station has two entrances, one is a standalone building, while the other is integrated into an apartment building. The station is covered in travertine limestone, which helps give it a light and warm colour inside.

From the west entrance all the way to the platforms themselves, beautiful artworks are embedded into the walls, which celebrate Montréal's Italian Community and nearby Marché Jean-Talon. 

The design of the station is quite stunning, especially when entering via the west entrance. The path to reach the mezzanine is at times suspended above the open space below, and even includes some suspended stairs. The path is a circular one from surface to platform, which helps ensure that all the minute details of this impeccable station are fully observed.

Once at the platforms, the artwork continues in several places, notably above the seating areas. 

UNIQUE FEATURES

The circular layout of the station from surface to platforms is quite unique, as are the suspended pathways and stairs from the west entrance.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The artwork is embedded into the walls and is entitled "Bas reliefs". They were created by artist Jean-Charles Charuest, and celebrate Montréal's Italian community, by depicting typical scenes at nearby Marché Jean-Talon.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 16, 1986
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Parc
  • Following Station: Jean-Talon
  • Entrances: 2

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Jean-Talon

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Jean-Talon is one of the four transfer stations of the Montreal Metro, serving both the Orange and Blue lines.

It was named in honour of Jean-Talon street, which was named in honour of Jean Talon, who was intendant of New France.

The station has four entrances, 7100 Berri, 430 Jean-Talon East, 522 Jean-Talon East, and a fully automated entrance on 780 Jean-Talon East. The entrances are all nice and attractive, each being more independent looking than the others. Having been built in different eras, they constitute a good mix of materials and colours, and each one has its own charm.

The Orange line was originally the only one at this station, and its side platforms are the highest. Their design is relatively modest, with the majority of the walls and floor being in tones of grey. The floor around the sections which lead to the Blue line are orange as a way of showing those who arrive that this is the Orange line platform. Since the Blue line service ends earlier, there are grills that can be closed when it's not in service.

In order to link the Orange line and Blue line platforms, large volumes were built on both sides of the station. They are beautiful, with orange and blue flooring and greyish walls. Directional panels are suspended from the ceiling, and are also in orange and blue, with their look similar to those at Snowdon, although there they are installed on the walls instead of from the ceiling. Also in these spaces, you can see some chazy limestone, which is the rock from which the station was built.

In order not to close the Orange line when the Blue line was built, the Blue line was built with stacked platforms. The Snowdon platform is the upper one. Trains on this platform have doors opening on the left. The highlight of this platform is a wall mural by Judith Bricault Klein that represents the transfer between the two lines. The Saint-Michel platform is lower and despite having a blue floor and blue seats (like the Snowdon platform), the walls are more in tones of grey and brown.

Points of interest include Plaza Saint-Hubert, which is a group of stores and restaurants grouped together, and also Jean-Talon market, Little Italy, as well as Tour Jean-Talon, which is an office tower from which an entry to the station is integrated.

UNIQUE FEATURES

One unique feature is the stacked platforms on the Blue line which also result in trains on Snowdon platforms having doors open on the left. It is also the only station in the network that was built as a single-line station and was changed into a transfer station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

One of the most beautiful artworks in all the network is Judith Bricault Klein's enamelled steel mural of 256 panels. Another great piece of art is Gilbert Sauvé's mural on both of the Blue line platforms, which are blue arrows combined with orange circles on concrete which indicate the direction the trains are going.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: October 14, 1966 (Line 2) & June 16, 1986 (Line 5)
  • Line: 2 & 5
  • Previous Station: Beaubien (Line 2) & De Castelnau (Line 5)
  • Following Station: Jarry (Line 2) & Fabre (Line 5)
  • Entrances: 4

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Fabre

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Fabre is a station on the Blue Line of Montreal's Metro. The station received its name from nearby rue Fabre, which itself honours Monseigneur Édouard-Charles Fabre, who was Montreal's first archbishop.

This station has two entrances, one of which has a convenience store at the surface. This entrance is also quite spacious inside with the escalators and stairs located nearly in the middle of the large space. It is also surrounded by glass, bringing in lots of natural light. 

Heading down into the station, the signature-coloured panelling makes its appearance along most of the walls of the station. Made up primarily of various shades of blue, green and purple, they stretch from the entrances right through the platforms. The mezzanine levels have a honeycomb-style ceiling, which integrates the lighting for those spaces.

Platform-level seating almost resembles little seat pods sticking out from the panelled walls. A continuous handrail runs nearly the entire length of the platforms and artistically wraps itself around the shapes and curves of the wall panels.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The look of the station itself is very colourful with the coloured wall panelling. This creates a very calm and inviting space to be in and discover.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork is the coloured panelled walls and the handrail. It was created by artist Jean-Noël Poliquin. The panels are coloured polymer concrete, while the handrail is stainless steel.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 16, 1986
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Jean-Talon
  • Following Station: D'Iberville
  • Entrances: 2

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D'Iberville

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D'Iberville is a station on the Blue Line of Montreal's Metro. The station is named after rue D'Iberville, which itself was named in honour of Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville.

The station has two entrances; however, it is interesting to note that while one entrance has a ticket booth, the other is automated and not supervised by staff at that location. Additional fencing was installed at this automated entrance location to further limit access to avoid fare evasion.

The entrance is open to the mezzanine below. From the escalators and through the mezzanine area, the space is predominantly lit with green or yellow-tinted lights, creating an interesting ambience. Natural light also enters the mezzanine from the entrance above.

Proceeding to the mid-level above the platforms, the main art piece comes into view over the tunnelled portion of the station. It is an aluminum representation of a ship called Le Pélican, which belonged to explorer Pierre Lemoyne D'Iberville.

At the platforms, red brick and brown tile make up the walls and floor. Nice solid red benches surrounded by brick make up the seating areas.

UNIQUE FEATURES

One of the unique features of this station is the automated entrance, which it is the only one in the metro system to not have a staff member located in close proximity. Special fencing helps delineate this area and helps limit fare evasion.

The green/yellow lighting on the mezzanine level adds an extra level of ambience and wonder to the station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

The main artwork of the station is found above the platforms at the mouth of the tunnelled section. It is entitled "Le Pélican", which was a ship at sea by New France explorer Pierre Lemoyne D'Iberville. The artist, Eddy Tardif created this representation of the ship by sculpting enormous pieces of styrofoam, which were then covered with compacted sand, to be used as moulds for the molten aluminum used to cast the sculpture.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 16, 1986
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: Fabre
  • Following Station: Saint-Michel
  • Entrances: 2

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Saint-Michel

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Saint-Michel is the eastern terminus of the Blue Line of the Montreal Metro.

It was named in honour of Boulevard Saint-Michel, which itself was named in honour of the Saint-Michel neighbourhood in which both the boulevard and station are located.

The station has two entrances, 7270 Saint-Michel and 7325 Saint-Michel. Both entrances are showing signs of the station, which are a mix of brown bricks with glass bricks. When you enter through the Eastern one (7325), you need to take the stairs or the escalators and they will lead you right to the turnstiles. No long walk underneath to reach them! Once past the turnstiles, you take another set of stairs or escalators to reach the platforms, but while on them you can admire the brown brick walls which shape the station and which have a mix of straight and curved parts. At the bottom, you will be ready to take the steps that lead to the Snowdon platform, while the overpass where passengers get out is parallel to the escalators. The stairs to reach the platforms are beautifully realized in one of the curvy parts of the station.

The platforms consist again of a mixture of brown bricks and glass bricks on the walls, with the central section of each one being the exception with some lighter gray tones.

UNIQUE FEATURES

This is the only station which has platforms of 102 metres instead of 152 like all other stations. To be more specific, this station has room for 6 cars while others have room for 9. This is at the time of writing in 2021 but will most likely be changed soon enough for two reasons. The first one is that the Blue Line will expand to the East in the coming years and therefore it would be logical to extend the station at the same time the line is extended. The second reason is that the Azur trains are not able to split into sets of 3, 6 or 9 cars and therefore, as the plan of the STM is to have Azur trains all over the network when the MR-73 are retired, this will definitely need to be addressed.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

On the platforms, there are glass bricks painted by Marcelin Cardinal, Charles Lemay, Lauréat Marois and Normand Moffat. The glass bricks were used to represent the Saint-Michel neighbourhood, which also uses them.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: June 16, 1986
  • Line: 5
  • Previous Station: D'Iberville
  • Entrances: 2

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Overview of Line 5 : Blue Line

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Line 5, commonly called the blue line due to its color on the map, is the newest line of the Montreal Metro. Although it opened in 1986, its planning dates to much earlier as Snowdon station's construction began in 1975 and it was done with a cross-platform interchange where line 2 trains would share an island platform with a future line.

On June 16, 1986, the line opened, but even though Snowdon station was already built, they started on the Eastern side from Saint-Michel to De Castelnau. A year later, on June 15, 1987, Parc opened, and a few months after that, on January 4, 1988, the line went all the way to Snowdon, although for the first few months it skipped Acadie, who was the last station to open on the line on March 28, 1988. That latest extension also brought the metro to Outremont.5 stations are projected to be added in 2026 and would bring the metro to Saint-Léonard and Anjou.

Rolling stock has always been the MR-73 by Bombardier, but as opposed to other lines, trains are consisting of 6 cars instead of 9. That's why platforms will all have "Tête de train" or "Queue de train" written so passengers know where to stand. The exception to this rule is Saint-Michel, whose platform is only the length of 6 cars. That would be problematic if the MPM-10 trains were to be in service there as those trains cannot split. Also, line 5 is the only one where MR-63 never was in service, yet ironically, they did a one-day stay there on June 21, 2018, and it ended up being their last ride on the Montreal Metro.

The frequency of trains is 3 to 5 minutes during peak hours, 5 to 10 during non-peak hours, and 8 to 11 minutes on weekends.

Trains who need maintenance go to Youville workshop between Parc and De Castelnau.From there they can reach and switch to line 2 between Crémazie and Sauvé, just like they can at Snowdon station.

The majority of the stations have side platforms. Jean-Talon has stacked platforms and Snowdon has island platforms (with the other line).

D"Iberville
Université-de-Montréal
Snowdon
Jean-Talon
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